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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

The Traditional Scarecrow

I was halfway through my childhood before finding the nerve to watch The Wizard of Oz without hiding at some point during the film. I suppose it was the witch (the wicked one from the west) — it would be an understatement to say that she intimidated me. The scarecrow was a much more pleasant fellow but, truth be known, he was also a bit unsettling to me ...

>> read “The Traditional Scarecrow”    
A Hotbed of Ideas
Try These Flowerbed Ideas In Your Own Landscape

Try These Flowerbed Ideas In Your Own Landscape

>> read “A Hotbed of Ideas”    
Invasives in the Trade
The threat in your own yard

Plant exploration has been an alluring and exciting facet of the horticultural world for millennia. Centuries ago, exotic plants moved along the Silk Road between Europe and Asia. During the age of sailing, individuals paid a king’s ransom for rare specimens for their glass houses and royal estates. During the Victorian era, the up-and-coming ...

>> read “Invasives in the Trade”    
The Rudiments Of Roses
Don’t Shy Away From Growing Roses!

Truly there are varieties available for even the most timid or inexperienced gardeners. All roses require some attention, but numerous types are more self sufficient, thriving for years with minimal care.

>> read “The Rudiments Of Roses”    
Backyard Birds
Keep feathered friends flocking to your garden

"Tea-kettle, tea-kettle,"sings the little Carolina wren as it crouches in the garden shed waiting for the most opportune moment to sneak from its perch to the suet hanging from the old oak tree. Nearby, a shy and diminutive Carolina chickadee scolds the gray squirrel with a "chickadee-dee-dee" for stealing the small sunflower seeds that were destined for his early morning breakfast.

>> read “Backyard Birds”    
Seeds of Simplicity: The Shaker Seed Industry

During the summer months, I can see the results of those tiny seed envelopes that I excitedly purchased in March from ambitiously dog-eared catalogs. A quick inventory of the garden reveals my successes and failures — summer squash overrunning the garden path and tomato seedlings that just stopped trying between my June vacation and Independence Day ...

>> read “Seeds of Simplicity: The Shaker Seed Industry”    
Containers for Every Season
Ideas to inspire

Gardens are getting smaller and gardening time is getting shorter - that has been true for several years now and will probably continue to be true. But another prevailing trend is that container gardening is strong and getting stronger, not only because of time and space, but because containers offer quick satisfaction with minimal effort. You don't have to be trained in design to create stunning focal points for your garden; you just need to follow a few simple guidelines to set yourself up for success.

>> read “Containers for Every Season”    
Savory Okra Pickles

For this recipe, you need six very clean wide-mouth pint jars, sterilized as directed by manufacturer, 6 lids and 6 bands separated into a shallow pot of boiling hot water ...

>> read “Savory Okra Pickles”       #Recipes
Tillandsia: Plentiful and Diverse

Mention the genus Tillandsia to most gardeners, and you get a puzzled look. No, I’m not talking about the eight-legged spider (that the mere mention of its name invokes fear). I said, “Tillandsia,” not tarantula. These plants don’t bite! Even though Tillandsia, the largest genus of the bromeliad family of plants, has several species that resemble the ominous tarantula, rest assured that no harm will come to you by owning these unique plants ...

>> read “Tillandsia: Plentiful and Diverse”    
Watch Them Grow
Imaginations Blossom When Children Plant Gardens

True gardeners of every age find it fun to dig in the dirt, play with water, feel the texture and size of various seeds, plant them and watch them grow. Children are curious and want to know what is happening underground as well as on top.

>> read “Watch Them Grow”    
Herb in Autumn

What should I do with my herbs for the winter? Will they all die? Should I bring them all indoors? These are the most frequently asked questions about herb gardening this time of year. Herb gardening does not necessarily stop as soon as the basil flowers and goes to seed. Fall is a good time for cleanup in the herb garden and growing can continue indoors once the weather cools off to ...

>> read “Herb in Autumn”    
‘Appalachian Red’ Redbud

The eastern redbud has long been a staple for Virginia gardeners and when the delicate flowers fill the forest edges, warmer weather is just a whisper away. While our native redbud’s popularity remains strong, there has been a host of newcomers hitting the streets in the last few years. One of my personal favorites is Cercis canadensis ‘Appalachian Red’ or the Appalachian red redbud.

>> read “‘Appalachian Red’ Redbud”       #Hot Plants