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Featured Articles!

Build a Better Rose Garden

Roses have been cultivated for many centuries, but according to legend it was Empress Josephine who created the modern rose garden. Her ambition was to acquire every known variety, and her collection was laid out in orderly rows. Now 200 years later, many rose gardens are still planted out in this style ...

>> read “Build a Better Rose Garden”    
Sunny and Dry? No Problem!

The key to growing plants that love sunny dry conditions is not Zone hardiness but perfect drainage. Here’s how to create that perfect spot.

>> read “Sunny and Dry? No Problem!”    
Create a Focal Point in a Day

Gardening is usually an exercise in patience. Everything takes time. But here are a few ways to get instant gratification by creating some ‘pop’ in the landscape with new focal points. We gardeners revel in a pastime that is all about the long game. We are used to waiting and the sport truly does reward us for our patience ...

>> read “Create a Focal Point in a Day”    
Create the Look of an English Garden In Your Midwest Landscape

Clusters of fragrant double roses clambering over white picket fences, fields of wildflowers and cottage gardens filled with lupines and delphiniums — this is what I expected to find when I traveled to London last spring for the first time ...

>> read “Create the Look of an English Garden In Your Midwest Landscape”    
False Cypress
Chamaecyparis

Say “cama-sip-a-ris.” Yes, this is a mouthful — and an evergreen conifer whose name is worth stumbling over. Every landscape would be more beautiful year-round for having several types of false cypress — from 6-inch alpines to 3-foot dwarfs to medium- and large-size trees.

>> read “False Cypress”       #Hot Plants
50 Ways to Leave Your Water

Learn this new tune and change the way you water your garden. With apologies to musician Paul Simon, there must be 50 ways to leave your water. Just slip out the back, door; make a new plan, man; you don’t need to drag hose, Boz, just listen to me ...

>> read “50 Ways to Leave Your Water”    
No More Rose Divas

The rose, queen of all flowers, has a rather haughty reputation: difficult to grow, prone to diseases and pests, and dies after a few years. There are still a few divas around, but many rose varieties are not obstinate or impossible to grow. In the words of Peter Schneider, author of Right Rose, Right Place, “If you can grow a marigold, you can grow a rose.” The rose is one of the most decorative and adaptable of all flowers ...

>> read “No More Rose Divas”    
The Buzz: Beekeeping Basics

They are pollinators and they are honey makers. Ever think about keeping bees? Here’s a primer on where to start.
My first experiences with honeybees as a child were mixed. Running barefoot through a dandelion-covered yard as a young boy resulted in a sting as I stepped on a foraging honeybee ...

>> read “The Buzz: Beekeeping Basics”    
Lawn Care for Minnesota Landscapes
Has grass gotten a bad rap?

Deb Brown, garden writer and retired University of Minnesota Extension horticulturist, thinks maybe so. In a newspaper article a while back, she made some very good arguments for having a yard and garden with at least some turfgrass. Here’s her thinking:

Having a lawn is less work than maintaining a small prairie in a front yard ...

>> read “Lawn Care for Minnesota Landscapes”       #Advice   #Landscaping
Invasive Invaders

Many species of non-native invasive plants, insects and animals plague the Midwest. Why should gardeners care? Here is what you need to know. Chestnut blight in the early 1900s. Dutch elm disease in the mid-1900s. Emerald ash borer in the early 2000s. Asian longhorned beetle has been discovered in five states with the most recent find in Ohio. The list of invasive species goes on and grows ...

>> read “Invasive Invaders”    
Down and Dirty: Making Your Soil Suitable for Gardening

Poor soil is the leading cause for landscape plant problems. But if you make the effort before starting your lawn or planting your landscape, your gardening skills will be the envy of the neighborhood.

>> read “Down and Dirty: Making Your Soil Suitable for Gardening”    
Plan Your Cutting Garden Now

I used to consider my cutting garden a luxury. I think of it as a necessity now, as it has contributed so much to my quality of life. Reveling in my new ability to fill vases throughout my home, I assemble arrangements of blooms coordinated specifically to work with the colors in my interiors. It is wonderfully satisfying to bring fresh bouquets to friends, neighbors and my children’s teachers and coaches ...

>> read “Plan Your Cutting Garden Now”    
 
 
 

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