SUBSCRIBE & GET YOUR FREE 10% OFF DISCOUNT CARD
Subscribe Now
Give a Gift
Preview the magazine before you buy.
Read a FREE issue online!
Indiana Gardening Cover

Subscribe Today!
1-888-265-3600

 

  Sign up for our free gardening E-newsletter 
Give us your email address* and we'll provide monthly gardening tips and how-to's, great landscape ideas and plants to try — Delivered right to your inbox!
Your Email:
* Your email address will not be sold or shared with any third parties.

 

Calendar of Events
See our calendar for local events.

 

 

Get Involved
Participate in online discussions with an SBS user account.

Register Now  or  Log in

Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Sustainability: Right Plant, Right Place

A sustainable garden is a plant community that takes care of itself. By using the right plants in the right place, you can have a low- or no-maintenance landscape that is also eco-friendly.

>> read “Sustainability: Right Plant, Right Place”    
The Fifth Season

To everything there is a season, it is written, and no one knows this more than gardeners. We cold-climate growers have just wrapped up the biggest one of all – summer – and have enjoyed a pretty luxurious fall. Most of us don’t really look forward to the cold and gray days of winter, but at our house, we celebrate another growing season: The Amaryllis Season.

>> read “The Fifth Season”    
Thrift Shop Chic

Thrift-store shopping is no longer just frugal but also fashionable, especially when it comes to upcycling second-hand treasures as garden containers. Think vintage handbags, rugged cowboy boots, seldom-worn children’s dress shoes and discarded toy trucks — all vessels ready to fill with plants ...

>> read “Thrift Shop Chic”    
Winterscape With Garden Art
Give yourself the gift of amazing outdoor art

As a lifelong resident of the Midwest, I can attest to how brutal Mother Nature can be in the winter. White can be the predominant color from November all the way through March during particularly snowy winters. Waiting for the snow to thaw and the dreariness of winter to be replaced ...

>> read “Winterscape With Garden Art”    
The Dog Days Are Over: Summer Blues to Turn Down the Heat

My garden always starts to look tired in August. The roses have long since faded and given up. The daylilies are done screaming “orange!” in the corners. Even the annuals, the proud cheerleaders of color, have exhausted themselves in the heat ...

>> read “The Dog Days Are Over: Summer Blues to Turn Down the Heat”    
Grow Your Own Cutting Garden in as Little as 32 Square Feet

If you’re like me, you never tire of having fresh flowers in the house, and the more grand the floral arrangement, the better. The solution for me has been planting a dedicated cutting garden. In a sunny spot as small as 32 square feet (a space 4 feet by 8 feet), a well-planned cutting garden can produce enough blooms to keep me sated all season long. If you have a spot that is tucked away behind a garage or in a remote corner of your property where it is not highly visible, you can cut away and not spoil your perfect floral landscape ...

>> read “Grow Your Own Cutting Garden in as Little as 32 Square Feet”       #Advice
Hold the Salt

Most of the harm from snow really comes from how we get rid of it. Time for a little rethink. Who doesn’t love new snow? The white blanket softens the world and makes everything look new. And it’s a good thing for the garden. Snow cover insulates the soil so it is less likely to thaw and then freeze again. Enveloping snow protects plant tissue from cold snaps and adds moisture when it melts in spring.

>> read “Hold the Salt”    
Narrow-Leaf Ironweed
Vernonia lettermannii

With its profusion of small purple flowers and tolerance of heat and drought, narrow-leaf ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii) is a standout in the late-season perennial border in USDA Zones 4 to 9. Native to dry, rocky flood plains in Arkansas and Oklahoma, narrow-leaf ironweed thrives in almost all soil types, except soggy, heavy soils. In fact, supplemental fertilizers and excessive watering are discouraged in the garden setting ...

>> read “Narrow-Leaf Ironweed”       #Hot Plants
Cordyline australis

It is a “spike,” but not your grandmother’s spike; this is a spike in Technicolor…on steroids. This spring’s “Hot Plant” is Cordyline australis and it literally takes the heat, or any other weather condition you can throw at it. Drought is not an issue and I did not see one torn leaf when the derecho tore through our area last summer ...

>> read “Cordyline australis”       #Hot Plants
The Hottest Plants of 2012

If you’re passionate about cars, you attend the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, where you “See the cars today that the rest of the world will be talking about tomorrow.” To view upcoming trends in the clothing by American fashion designers, you make an appearance at the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week at Bryant Park in New York City. One of the best places to discover new plants is the New Varieties Showcase at the Farwest Show in Portland ...

>> read “The Hottest Plants of 2012”    
Mulches for the Vegetable Garden

Mulch inhibits weeds and conserves soil moisture. However, many gardeners don’t use mulch in their vegetable beds. Here’s the lowdown on which mulches to use and how to use them. When you mention mulch, the first thought that comes to most minds is the aesthetic look of it in the landscape. A nice, dark bark mulch makes the plants in the bed standout a bit more, but mulch is more than looks ...

>> read “Mulches for the Vegetable Garden”    
Conserving Water with Rain Barrels

Rain barrels are not a new concept. However, based on the many benefits they offer, it is surprising that they are not more commonly used. I have had my rain barrels now for three years and would highly recommend them to any gardener looking to conserve water by harnessing what nature provides.

>> read “Conserving Water with Rain Barrels”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


I Miss You
Why and How I Miss You

[+] Shade Solutions Blog