Warming Herbs for Winter
by Jim Long

Ever wonder why some herbs are popular in summer while others gain prominence in fall and winter? There are some very good reasons why we use mint, parsley, lavender and lemongrass in summer, and why sage, rosemary, thyme, hyssop and others are considered winter herbs.   >> read article
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Winter Planning for the Spring Garden
by Ruth Mason McElvain

Whether you are a veteran victory gardener or an eager beginner with a few pots, experts agree that a little advance scheming makes for a better garden, saving time, money and wear and tear on your own momentum. February, with its frigid air, freezing rain and slumbering garden, is a perfect time for planning.   >> read article
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Versatile Winter Squash: Stuffed or Gratin
by Kate Jerome

A cold winter evening is just the right kind of weather to fire up the oven and bake the fruits of fall and winter, savory winter squash (and that includes pumpkins). The aroma that drifts through the house will make even the pickiest eater hungry. Best of all, because they store so well, you can usually purchase all types through the winter months.   >> read article
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11 Plants that Love the Cold
by Ben Futa

As the Director of the Allen Centennial Garden, a public garden on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, I’m always on the lookout for plants that extend the season of interest for our visitors. Plants that are hardy, easy to grow and dependable rank high on this list of some of our favorites.   >> read article
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Growing Microgreens
by Carol Michel

If you are looking for a winter crop that is easy to grow indoors and adds freshness and nutrition to many dishes, grow microgreens. Microgreens are the seedlings of many of the greens and other vegetables we commonly grow in the garden, harvested when the plants have grown just one set of true leaves ...   >> read article
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Bedtime for Roses
by Nina Koziol

Not all roses need winter protection, but for those that do, here’s how to prepare them for a long winter nap.

Summer is just a memory now for gardeners as they clean and stow their tools and look forward to the holidays. But before you get sidetracked, have you thought about putting your roses to bed for the winter ...   >> read article
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Hold the Salt
by Beth Botts

Most of the harm from snow really comes from how we get rid of it. Time for a little rethink. Who doesn’t love new snow? The white blanket softens the world and makes everything look new. And it’s a good thing for the garden. Snow cover insulates the soil so it is less likely to thaw and then freeze again. Enveloping snow protects plant tissue from cold snaps and adds moisture when it melts in spring.   >> read article
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Winterscape With Garden Art
Give yourself the gift of amazing outdoor art
by Joyce Kuryla

As a lifelong resident of the Midwest, I can attest to how brutal Mother Nature can be in the winter. White can be the predominant color from November all the way through March during particularly snowy winters. Waiting for the snow to thaw and the dreariness of winter to be replaced ...   >> read article
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