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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Impatiens Disease Spurs A Hunt For Shady Alternatives

Impatiens—for years they have been your go-to solution for providing brilliant color in the shade. Bedding impatiens is by far one of the most popular annuals for shade. Drive down a shady lane and you’re bound to see these colorful pink, red, salmon, purple and white annuals bordering beds and pathways ...

>> read “Impatiens Disease Spurs A Hunt For Shady Alternatives”       #Edibles   #Feature
Step-by-Step - Create a Raised Garden Bed

Now is the time to think about all those new garden beds you want to add in 2012. Here is a step-by-step primer on how to construct a raised bed the right way — from the ground up. The simple, cruel fact of ornamental gardening is that even when we do every other facet right, failure is all too common if our soil is bad. Improving our soil from the very start is an absolute must — especially when starting a new bed ...

>> read “Step-by-Step - Create a Raised Garden Bed”    
Deadheading Details

If only all our perennials performed like blanket flower (Gaillardia). It’s one plant that’s flush with flowers, burgeoning buds and attractive globe-shaped seed heads from early summer until frost.

>> read “Deadheading Details”    
Gardening When it Hurts

After a day of gardening, do you crawl into bed with a heat pack, an ice pack or maybe even a six-pack? Do you have special pillows for knee pain, neck pain and a pair of wrist splints for carpal tunnel pain? When you limp to the kitchen for a midnight snack of aspirin, are there so many magnets strapped to your body that you stick to the refrigerator door?

>> read “Gardening When it Hurts”    
Aloes

When you think of aloe, you probably think of Aloe vera, the burn plant, but with the explosion in popularity of succulents in the last several years, many new hybrids, as well as lesser-known species, are now available to plant lovers. These tough plants will enjoy a sunny spot on your summer patio and do equally as well in a sunny window ...

>> read “Aloes”       #Hot Plants
Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest

With the cold winter behind and the warm, humid summer just about here, I begin to dream of the tropics, and with that, the full-flavored, juicy fruit whose sweet fragrances fill outdoor markets and lone fruit stands on the side roads. Sadly though, with the economy not cooperating and the present fashion to have stay-cations, I have decided I could and would have both. Thus began my search for the ever-elusive tropical fruits that I could grow in my Kentucky backyard garden.

>> read “Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest”    
Best Bulbs for Soggy Spots

Most spring-blooming bulbs rot in soggy soils. But some bulbs actually thrive. Here are several spring-blooming bulbs you can plant now to brighten up your boggy areas. Gardeners with very moist or wet soil often despair, resigning themselves to being “bulbless.” I am happy to report that some bulbs actually like wet places and will not rot ...

>> read “Best Bulbs for Soggy Spots”    
Seven-Son Flower
Heptacodium miconioides

Heptacodium miconioides or seven-son flower is new to most Minnesota gardeners. Sometimes called a crapemyrtle for the north, it is a large shrub with attractive peeling bark and late-summer blooms. When freezing temperatures evade our region until late fall, bright red calyxes develop, which offer further interest. Heptacodium is adaptable, but it prefers a sunny location and well-drained, neutral or acid soil.

>> read “Seven-Son Flower”       #Hot Plants
Is THIS Poison Ivy?

Several weeks ago, poison ivy horticulturist Umar Mycka and I were driving to Longwood Gardens to do training about poison ivy. “Look at that,” said Mycka, pointing to the right. I saw a tall privet hedge overhanging a public sidewalk by half. He'd spotted huge leaves of poison ivy waving from deep inside the shrub ...

>> read “Is THIS Poison Ivy?”    
Become a Water-Wise Gardener

Plant madness consumes gardeners in the months of May and June. But before loading that hot new plant on to your garden cart, give some thought as to what it needs in terms of care and how you plan to provide it. Will it be stuck into an empty spot in a perennial bed, with no thought as to its need for water? Or will it spend a couple of months in its pot, requiring daily watering, as it becomes root- bound and struggles?

>> read “Become a Water-Wise Gardener”       #Advice   #Feature
Blessed Are the Aggressive, For They Shall Inherit the Garden

Ideally, good, aggressive garden plants are tough, spread nicely and can be controlled easily by pulling, cultivation or herbicides. The thicker and taller they are, the better they suppress weeds. But what exactly are ‘good’ aggressive plants ...

>> read “Blessed Are the Aggressive, For They Shall Inherit the Garden”    
Conserving Water with Rain Barrels

Rain barrels are not a new concept. However, based on the many benefits they offer, it is surprising that they are not more commonly used. I have had my rain barrels now for three years and would highly recommend them to any gardener looking to conserve water by harnessing what nature provides.

>> read “Conserving Water with Rain Barrels”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Renovate a Neglected Perennial Garden
Steps to renovate a perennial flower bed

[+] North Country Gardening