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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Plant for a Year Full of Beauty

Upper Midwest gardeners know the preciousness of growing things. They typically have five to seven months to cram in as much green and growing things as they can. A well-planned landscape can ensure that beyond the prime growing season, landscapes are filled with beautiful flowers, leaves, bark and structure ...

>> read “Plant for a Year Full of Beauty”       #Fall   #Spring   #Summer   #Winter
Tips for Winter Tree & Shrub Care

Winter can be a difficult time for our trees and shrubs. Cold weather, snow, wind and more threaten their health. I’ve seen too many trees and shrubs lost that could have been saved with the right care. By caring for the roots, stem and crown you can maintain healthy and attractive plants through the most trying season of the year.

>> read “Tips for Winter Tree & Shrub Care”    
10 Easy Vegetables

Interest in vegetable gardening is growing nationwide. The road to success with vegetable gardening, however, is sometimes bumpy. The astute gardener soon learns the importance of choosing a good garden site and planning. Even with all of the ingredients in place, however, challenges can occur that test the patience of gardeners, especially children ...

>> read “10 Easy Vegetables”    
From the Mediterranean to Midwestern Gardens

Midwestern gardeners can ‘visit’ the Italian countryside by growing Umbrian plants – cyclamen of all kinds and colors, wisteria that scrambles up walls and trellises, ‘wild’ grape hyacinth and treasured tree peonies are just a few. Here’s where to start your trip ...

>> read “From the Mediterranean to Midwestern Gardens”    
Commotion ‘Moxie’ Blanketflower
Gaillardia x grandiflora ‘Moxie’

For years, there was no love lost between me and blanketflowers. Despite their colors, proud garden pennants of my alma mater Iowa State, I just didn’t dig them. So many of the seed strains lack any sort of charm or panache—they melt in the summer, fall apart into a disheveled mess by fall and reseed on top of each other, resembling an unruly mosh pit. Blech ...

>> read “Commotion ‘Moxie’ Blanketflower”       #Hot Plants
The Importance of Pollination

There are many organisms involved in the process of pollination: wasps, butterflies, moths, flies, beetles, ants, bats and other mammals, including humans. If there were no pollinators, there would be no gardens. Here are some fascinating facts about pollination ...

>> read “The Importance of Pollination”    
You Can Eat Your Roses!
And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums …

And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums … there are several beautiful common flowers in your ornamental garden that can add flavor to your food and add color as a garnish. Here’s where to start. Did you know that roses are red and edible too? Well not all roses are red, but they are edible and most definitely delicious too. I didn’t know that until I took a trip to England and Wales in 1999 with two girlfriends on a whirlwind tour of English and Welsh gardens ...

>> read “You Can Eat Your Roses!”    
Gardening Up High
Resplendent green rooftops provide benefits all year

Tall, slender stems of grass swish in the warm summer breezes, while coreopsis and coneflowers bob their heads, as if waving. They and dozens of other plants grow in a diverse garden planted on top of a garage in the middle of St. Louis, Missouri. If a person doesn't look up when walking or driving by, they'll miss seeing it.

>> read “Gardening Up High”    
Bottlebrush Buckeye

These graceful rounded shrubs have beautiful, large, bold-textured foliage and elegant spikes of white flowers. That is enough to make you love the bottlebrush buckeye right there. Add the fact that it loves shade, resists deer AND blooms in midsummer when most shade gardens are looking a bit dull, and you’ve got yourself an essential plant. Oh, did I mention it is an Eastern U. S. native and has gorgeous yellow fall color? Yeah, you need this shrub. The growth habit is suckering, so it can slowly spread to form a large colony. Or, you can prune to keep it contained if you don’t have the space ...

>> read “Bottlebrush Buckeye”       #Hot Plants
Honoring Our Elders: Preserving Ancient Trees

Trees that are 100, 200 or even 300 years old require special management techniques. Here are some examples of trees that are getting the proper care and some tips on how you can cultivate and coddle your own veteran trees.

>> read “Honoring Our Elders: Preserving Ancient Trees”    
Best Bulbs for Soggy Spots

Most spring-blooming bulbs rot in soggy soils. But some bulbs actually thrive. Here are several spring-blooming bulbs you can plant now to brighten up your boggy areas. Gardeners with very moist or wet soil often despair, resigning themselves to being “bulbless.” I am happy to report that some bulbs actually like wet places and will not rot ...

>> read “Best Bulbs for Soggy Spots”    
Jewelry for the Lawn

Just as a strong necklace can change the look of any outfit, the right lawn ornament can change the mood in any garden. So, the question is, what kind of a mood are you in?

>> read “Jewelry for the Lawn”       #Art   #Feature
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Renovate a Neglected Perennial Garden
Steps to renovate a perennial flower bed

[+] North Country Gardening