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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Lasagna Gardening

This isn’t about pasta — lasagna gardening is about building up soil in layers. The concept is based on layering compost ingredients, which also keeps weeds down. Here’s the ‘recipe' ...

>> read “Lasagna Gardening”    
Planting By Design
Neighboring gardeners with different attitudes

Here’s my pet theory. All of us gardeners fall into one of two camps: plant lovers or design doyennes. The former waxes eloquent in Latin nomenclature, often with anthropomorphic plant references while using words such as “cultural requirements” and “fastigiated branching.” The design doyennes look for the big picture in the garden and are less concerned with individual plants ...

>> read “Planting By Design”    
Mercury Rising Tickseed

Be sure to add this brand new, first of its kind, truly hardy, red flowered coreopsis to your wish list this spring. It’s an absolute dynamo that blooms all summer. The broad mound of bright green foliage becomes covered in gorgeous, velvety, wine-red blossoms. During the hottest part of summer, the petals have lightly “frosted” tips. Like the others in the Big Bang™ series, the flowers on Mercury Rising are sterile, so it blooms continuously for months and won’t reseed around the garden ...

>> read “Mercury Rising Tickseed”       #Hot Plants
Weed Wondering

The presence of certain lawn weeds can be an indicator of specific environmental and soil conditions. Here’s how to ‘read’ your weeds. If you keep your eyes open, you can uncover clues as to why certain things happen. Keeping track of your weed problems can do just that. The end of the year is a good time to reflect on the problems you encountered and make plans to fix them in the coming year ...

>> read “Weed Wondering”    
Plant Your Spring Lawn Now

Next May, wouldn’t you love to have the best looking-lawn in your neighborhood? If your answer is yes, you need to begin by overseeding now. It is hard to believe that putting seed down now will make that big of a difference six months from now, but it does.

>> read “Plant Your Spring Lawn Now”    
Ficus benjamina as a Bonsai Plant
Ficus benjamina

Bonsai (pronounced BONE-sigh) plants are one of the fastest selling items in our Botanical Conservatory’s Gift Shop. The plants make great gifts and are small enough that they will fit into any brightly lit space. The bonsai are created by members of the local Bonsai Club who volunteer at our greenhouse. Ficus benjamina is the plant they use for most of their bonsai and recommend for first-timers. Creating a bonsai is considered an art, and the plants require more care than the average houseplant, but with minimal input you will be successful ...

>> read “Ficus benjamina as a Bonsai Plant”       #Hot Plants
Millstones: Symbols of Harvest in Today’s Gardens

When it comes to collecting millstones, the maxim “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” rings true. In the late 1880s, large urban mill operators started dumping these grain and corn crushers out back as a new roller technology made them obsolete and eventually put the smaller rural mills out of business. When propped alongside an old mill, the granite wheels’ interesting patterns began to attract attention for their ornamental appeal. Others were put to use as stepping stones along a path or a stoop for the back door ...

>> read “Millstones: Symbols of Harvest in Today’s Gardens”    
Two for One: Making More of Your Space

Double your space by planting spring-flowering bulbs alongside perennials, trees and shrubs. Everyone loves a bargain – and if it’s a two-fer, even better. Gardeners never have enough space, but I have developed some strategies that double my space – using bulbs with shrubs, grasses or perennials. Thus I have color in my garden, sometimes in February and definitely in March, long before spring has actually arrived ...

>> read “Two for One: Making More of Your Space”    
2013 Best New Plants

So many new plants to choose from, so little space on the page to write about them. How will I ever choose which ones to share? I’ve come to the conclusion that no matter what, I cannot possibly cover even a fraction of all the new plant introductions I’d like to tell you passionate plant people about. What to do? I’ll let someone else help me! Let me share with you some new plants that were ...

>> read “2013 Best New Plants”    
Lawn Care for Minnesota Landscapes
Has grass gotten a bad rap?

Deb Brown, garden writer and retired University of Minnesota Extension horticulturist, thinks maybe so. In a newspaper article a while back, she made some very good arguments for having a yard and garden with at least some turfgrass. Here’s her thinking:

Having a lawn is less work than maintaining a small prairie in a front yard ...

>> read “Lawn Care for Minnesota Landscapes”       #Advice   #Landscaping
A Plant Collector’s Landscape Design: Three Lessons Learned

When I bought my last house, there was a half-dead rose bush, some stumps of dead arborvitaes and a lot of ugly fencing. I sold it last year after three and a half years, having created a garden in the front that I was rather pleased with. There are lots of tricks, rules and guidelines to making gardens, but here are three things that I feel helped me the most in creating this garden ...

>> read “A Plant Collector’s Landscape Design: Three Lessons Learned”       #Landscaping
Elaeagnus ‘Quicksilver’

If you know Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), you probably think of it as the weedy shrub that shows up along roadsides. ‘Quicksilver’ is a hybrid relative of that weed, decked out with astonishingly intense silver foliage that is absolutely breathtaking all summer. Like its weedy relative, it is insanely tough, tolerant of cold, heat and drought, the kind of plant you never need to worry about as long as you can give it a little sun ...

>> read “Elaeagnus ‘Quicksilver’”       #Hot Plants
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Renovate a Neglected Perennial Garden
Steps to renovate a perennial flower bed

[+] North Country Gardening