SUBSCRIBE & GET YOUR FREE 10% OFF DISCOUNT CARD
Subscribe Now
Give a Gift
Preview the magazine before you buy.
Read a FREE issue online!
Missouri Gardener Cover

Subscribe Today!
1-888-265-3600

 

  Sign up for our free gardening E-newsletter 
Give us your email address* and we'll provide monthly gardening tips and how-to's, great landscape ideas and plants to try — Delivered right to your inbox!
Your Email:
* Your email address will not be sold or shared with any third parties.

 

Calendar of Events
See our calendar for local events.

 

 

Get Involved
Participate in online discussions with an SBS user account.

Register Now  or  Log in

Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

ZZ Plant
Zamioculcas zamiifolia

The genus Zamioculcas has but one species, Zamioculcas zamiifolia. Say that 10 times quickly! To make things easy, everyone else just calls it ZZ plant. And there couldn’t be an easier plant to grow, either ...

>> read “ZZ Plant”       #Hot Plants
Have You Ever Seen a Frost Flower?

Seeing a frost flower first hand is a privilege afforded only to the early riser. Once exposed to the morning sun, they quickly disappear. Touch them and they shatter. A frost flower is really neither "frost" nor "flower," but layers of ice squeezed from the stem of a plant ...

>> read “Have You Ever Seen a Frost Flower?”    
Best Bulbs for Soggy Spots

Most spring-blooming bulbs rot in soggy soils. But some bulbs actually thrive. Here are several spring-blooming bulbs you can plant now to brighten up your boggy areas. Gardeners with very moist or wet soil often despair, resigning themselves to being “bulbless.” I am happy to report that some bulbs actually like wet places and will not rot ...

>> read “Best Bulbs for Soggy Spots”    
Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest

With the cold winter behind and the warm, humid summer just about here, I begin to dream of the tropics, and with that, the full-flavored, juicy fruit whose sweet fragrances fill outdoor markets and lone fruit stands on the side roads. Sadly though, with the economy not cooperating and the present fashion to have stay-cations, I have decided I could and would have both. Thus began my search for the ever-elusive tropical fruits that I could grow in my Kentucky backyard garden.

>> read “Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest”    
A Go-To Plant

Is there something in your wardrobe, a go-to outfit that you throw on when you need to look good and don’t have time to put a lot of thought into it? I’d be lost without those reliable clothes in my closet. In my garden, that role is filled by Sesleria autumnalis. This grass is commonly called autumn moor grass. I call it “friend” ...

>> read “A Go-To Plant”    
Honoring Our Elders: Preserving Ancient Trees

Trees that are 100, 200 or even 300 years old require special management techniques. Here are some examples of trees that are getting the proper care and some tips on how you can cultivate and coddle your own veteran trees.

>> read “Honoring Our Elders: Preserving Ancient Trees”    
Conserving Water with Rain Barrels

Rain barrels are not a new concept. However, based on the many benefits they offer, it is surprising that they are not more commonly used. I have had my rain barrels now for three years and would highly recommend them to any gardener looking to conserve water by harnessing what nature provides.

>> read “Conserving Water with Rain Barrels”    
Garden Mailbox

Plant a mailbox in the garden and you can keep garden tools in the garden, right where you need them. When the old mailboxes were replaced in the neighborhood, they were recycled into small “onsite garden storage units.” The garden mailbox is a good gathering place for storing garden tools and accessories. It could save you endless trips to the shed or garage for a garden tool.

>> read “Garden Mailbox”       #Tools
Lantana
Lantana camara

There are some gardeners, myself included, who regard the smell of lantana foliage as stinky. There are others who describe it as fragrant. Regardless, all can agree that they are flowering powerhouses. Lantanas are covered with 2- to 3-inch clustered blossoms all summer ...

>> read “Lantana”       #Hot Plants
Helleborus ‘Walhelivor’ Ivory Prince

A new Plant of Merit Introduction for 2011 — and one of the earliest bloomers for spring (I’ve personally seen blooms the end of February). Helleborus ‘Walhelivor’ is commonly sold in commerce by the trade name of Ivory Prince. It was selected in 1995 in Sussex, England, from a controlled breeding program designed to produce new Helleborus sp. plants that exhibited ...

>> read “Helleborus ‘Walhelivor’ Ivory Prince”       #Hot Plants
Floral Arranging American Style

Is it a bit cheeky to think I can create bouquets like White House Chief of Floral Design Laura Dowling after hearing her speak once? Foolish, perhaps. Fun, certainly.

>> read “Floral Arranging American Style”    
Give Your Vegetable Garden a Makeover

Your vegetable garden can be both productive and ornamental. Here are some tips to transform your humble edible plot ...

>> read “Give Your Vegetable Garden a Makeover”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Kitchen Herb Bouquets
Keep fresh herbs in the kitchen

[+] I Dig MO