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Featured Articles!

Rain, Rain, Don’t Go Away

Rainwater harvesting is one of the easiest ways gardeners can help save money and create beauty in their garden, while at the same time helping the environment.

>> read “Rain, Rain, Don’t Go Away”    
Invasive Invaders

Many species of non-native invasive plants, insects and animals plague the Midwest. Why should gardeners care? Here is what you need to know. Chestnut blight in the early 1900s. Dutch elm disease in the mid-1900s. Emerald ash borer in the early 2000s. Asian longhorned beetle has been discovered in five states with the most recent find in Ohio. The list of invasive species goes on and grows ...

>> read “Invasive Invaders”    
Indoors Today, Outdoors Tomorrow

When winter descends, spring’s warmth can’t arrive soon enough for the avid gardener. Many begin designing new garden plans and waiting for winter to thaw. The wait is over. You can garden year round in your home with interior foliage. Any garden veteran can become a successful interiorscaper by applying the same principles he or she uses outdoors. It is all a matter of the right plant in the right place ...

>> read “Indoors Today, Outdoors Tomorrow”    
The Edible Garden: What To Do When

Use this timeline to stay on track in the vegetable garden. But be prepared to make adjustments depending on the weather. Remember the growing season is shorter away from Lake Michigan.

>> read “The Edible Garden: What To Do When”    
Alliums for All

Alliums or ‘ornamental onions’ come in all sizes and colors—from giant globe-shaped purple spheres to delicate yellow sprays. The best part is that deer, squirrels, voles and rabbits find them foul-tasting. Here are some awe-inspiring alliums to add to your garden this year.

>> read “Alliums for All”    
Standing Up to Salt

It’s no accident that a list of salt-tolerant plants reads a bit like a list of seaside plants. Without even looking at lists of such plants compiled by arboretums and universities, I can begin my own list from memory. Past walks along the coast of Cape Cod provide me with a mental image of plants that live in constant sea spray ...

>> read “Standing Up to Salt”       #Advice
‘Ogon’ Spirea
Spiraea thunbergii ‘Ogon’

Spiraea thunbergii ‘Ogon’ is a dense, twiggy, upright, multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with wiry, outward-arching branching. It typically grows 3 to 5 feet tall and as wide, often becoming somewhat open and leggy over time. ‘Ogon’ is a golden-leaved variety ...

>> read “‘Ogon’ Spirea”       #Hot Plants
Down and Dirty: Making Your Soil Suitable for Gardening

Poor soil is the leading cause for landscape plant problems. But if you make the effort before starting your lawn or planting your landscape, your gardening skills will be the envy of the neighborhood.

>> read “Down and Dirty: Making Your Soil Suitable for Gardening”    
Mailbox Gardens

Mail boxes that stand at the end of the driveway are a “good morning sendoff” and the first “welcome home” we receive at the end of the day ...

>> read “Mailbox Gardens”       #Art   #Landscaping
Planting By Design
Neighboring gardeners with different attitudes

Here’s my pet theory. All of us gardeners fall into one of two camps: plant lovers or design doyennes. The former waxes eloquent in Latin nomenclature, often with anthropomorphic plant references while using words such as “cultural requirements” and “fastigiated branching.” The design doyennes look for the big picture in the garden and are less concerned with individual plants ...

>> read “Planting By Design”    
Dangers in the Garden

There are many ways to injure yourself while working in the garden. Here is a safety primer that just might prevent a trip to the ER. If you are traveling to the backyard this summer, you better make sure you’ve had your shots! You also need eye and ear protection, gloves, hard-toed shoes, long-sleeved shirts, and long pants, a hat, sunscreen and insect repellent ...

>> read “Dangers in the Garden”    
No More Rose Divas

The rose, queen of all flowers, has a rather haughty reputation: difficult to grow, prone to diseases and pests, and dies after a few years. There are still a few divas around, but many rose varieties are not obstinate or impossible to grow. In the words of Peter Schneider, author of Right Rose, Right Place, “If you can grow a marigold, you can grow a rose.” The rose is one of the most decorative and adaptable of all flowers ...

>> read “No More Rose Divas”    
 
 
 

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