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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’
Lagerstroemia (indica x fauriei) ‘Pocomoke’

Do you enjoy the late-season flowers of crapemyrtle but don’t have space for a tree? Allow me to introduce you to ‘Pocomoke’—a handsome, dwarf crapemyrtle. It’s not quite knee-high—a densely branched mound of deep rosy-raspberry flowers floating above forest-green leaves.

>> read “Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’”       #Hot Plants
Dangers in the Garden

There are many ways to injure yourself while working in the garden. Here is a safety primer that just might prevent a trip to the ER. If you are traveling to the backyard this summer, you better make sure you’ve had your shots! You also need eye and ear protection, gloves, hard-toed shoes, long-sleeved shirts, and long pants, a hat, sunscreen and insect repellent ...

>> read “Dangers in the Garden”    
Veggies Front & Center

Many gardeners would like to grow fruits and vegetables but do not have a sunny backyard. Why not use the sunny front yard? It is possible to raise edibles in the front garden and still keep your curb appeal.

>> read “Veggies Front & Center”    
Sitting in the Garden

Our lives are so hectic anymore, working late, attending functions, running children to softball, hockey, dance and wherever they need to be that we have forgotten some of the simple pleasures of life that make us happy.

>> read “Sitting in the Garden”    
The Gall of it All

Galls are the enlargement of plant tissue caused by injury or irritation by parasitic organisms such as insects, mites, nematodes, fungi and bacteria. They are also interesting looking — knotty, lumpy and sometimes colorful. Learn which ones are common in your garden.

>> read “The Gall of it All”    
Facts and Folklore About Late-Blooming Wildflowers

In October, we tend to think the native blooming plants’ seasons are completed. But there are a number of beautiful native wildflowers whose blooms, foliage and seedpods add interest to October and late fall woodlands and prairies. Several species adapt to home gardens and can be found in garden centers or ordered from specialty native plant nurseries. Plus, each has an old story to tell.

>> read “Facts and Folklore About Late-Blooming Wildflowers”       #Flowers
ColorBlaze Keystone Kopper Coleus

The perfect annual for fall gardens, ColorBlaze Keystone Kopper coleus has unique coloring that blends well with many different plant combinations. It looks great with orange, gold, bronze and salmon, yet the purple highlights on the new growth tips contrast nicely with the copper-colored foliage. Use in fall container combinations or as an accent plant in flowerbeds and borders ...

>> read “ColorBlaze Keystone Kopper Coleus”       #Hot Plants
Millstones: Symbols of Harvest in Today’s Gardens

When it comes to collecting millstones, the maxim “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” rings true. In the late 1880s, large urban mill operators started dumping these grain and corn crushers out back as a new roller technology made them obsolete and eventually put the smaller rural mills out of business. When propped alongside an old mill, the granite wheels’ interesting patterns began to attract attention for their ornamental appeal. Others were put to use as stepping stones along a path or a stoop for the back door ...

>> read “Millstones: Symbols of Harvest in Today’s Gardens”    
Gardening for the Senses

Most gardens are designed to create a visual impact. However, adding plants and features that stimulate the other four senses — taste, smell, touch and hearing — will make the outdoor space so much more exciting to all visitors ...

>> read “Gardening for the Senses”    
Winter Is for Reading

You don’t have to drool over catalogs with photographs of pastel petals dripping in dew, now arriving by the armloads, to feed your flower addiction in winter. Instead you can discover great, important, entertaining, informing and jaw-dropping beautiful garden books, magazines and pictures — with expired copyrights — completely free on the Internet. Everything you ever wanted to see and everything you never knew you wanted to see ...

>> read “Winter Is for Reading”    
Smooth Oxeye
Heliopsis helianthoides var. scabra

Smooth oxeye, also called false sunflower or early sunflower (Heliopsis helianthoides var. scabra) is an herbaceous, clumping perennial native to much of Eastern North America. Found naturally in dry to moist open woods, smooth oxeye is especially known for its long-flowering duration (June through September). The cheery, daisy-like flowers are comprised of yellow to orange-yellow rays surrounding a cone-shaped central disk ...

>> read “Smooth Oxeye”       #Hot Plants
Coir competency

Once considered a waste product, coir is now used as mulch, soil conditioner and as a hydroponic growth medium. This organic fiber is an ideal material for worm composers. It is also used to grow mushrooms. It is bacteria free and will deter slugs ...

>> read “Coir competency”       #Fertilizing
 
 
 

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