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Featured Articles!

Spring-Blooming Plants, Shrubs and Trees for Early Pollinators

This is the time when we feel most alive and our senses seem to be in overdrive. It’s the promise of renewal and awakening. Spring has finally arrived ...

>> read “Spring-Blooming Plants, Shrubs and Trees for Early Pollinators”    
No More Boring Spring Borders

Spring-blooming bulbs fill in the otherwise flowerless perennial bed with tufts of fabulous foliage and flower color. If your perennial border is boring until May, add some bulbs now — fall is the time to plant them.

>> read “No More Boring Spring Borders”    
Why Do Plants Fail?

Even experts can kill plants—which is why Roy Diblik offers seven common reasons perennials die.
It’s happened to us all. We have plants (usually the prized, expensive ones) that grow for a season—or maybe a few years—and then they die ...

>> read “Why Do Plants Fail?”    
Recycled Projects for the Garden

When you say “recycling,” most people think of plastic, paper and metals items. They clean and separate these items each week for trash pickup or take them to a recycling center. But what do you do with those items that you need to discard that you cannot easily recycle or may be too big for trash pickup? Why not get creative and give those items a new life in the garden? You can reuse or repurpose them. Here are four easy to make projects for your garden that can be made from those unwanted items ...

>> read “Recycled Projects for the Garden”       #Design   #Feature
Ficus benjamina as a Bonsai Plant
Ficus benjamina

Bonsai (pronounced BONE-sigh) plants are one of the fastest selling items in our Botanical Conservatory’s Gift Shop. The plants make great gifts and are small enough that they will fit into any brightly lit space. The bonsai are created by members of the local Bonsai Club who volunteer at our greenhouse. Ficus benjamina is the plant they use for most of their bonsai and recommend for first-timers. Creating a bonsai is considered an art, and the plants require more care than the average houseplant, but with minimal input you will be successful ...

>> read “Ficus benjamina as a Bonsai Plant”       #Hot Plants
Floral Arranging American Style

Is it a bit cheeky to think I can create bouquets like White House Chief of Floral Design Laura Dowling after hearing her speak once? Foolish, perhaps. Fun, certainly.

>> read “Floral Arranging American Style”    
Conserving Water with Rain Barrels

Rain barrels are not a new concept. However, based on the many benefits they offer, it is surprising that they are not more commonly used. I have had my rain barrels now for three years and would highly recommend them to any gardener looking to conserve water by harnessing what nature provides.

>> read “Conserving Water with Rain Barrels”    
Growing Wild: Eight Outstanding Wildflowers for Fluctuating Climates

Weather in the Midwest can take its toll on plants, especially those less suited for its fluctuating conditions. Having an appealing four-season landscape often requires gardening with plants that adapt ...

>> read “Growing Wild: Eight Outstanding Wildflowers for Fluctuating Climates”       #Flowers
No Fuss…No Till

A growing number of experts say annual tilling is unnecessary—maybe even harmful. Here’s why. Garden wisdom has long held that preparing a vegetable garden means yearly tilling: digging to mix up the top 6 or 8 inches of soil and incorporate new organic matter such as compost to increase its fertility.

>> read “No Fuss…No Till”    
Three Ways to Celebrate Fall with Pumpkins

Maybe I always wanted to be Cinderella, but who knows? It could take a therapist several years and thousands of dollars to unearth the root cause of this obsession. Whatever the reason, I am hopelessly enchanted by pumpkins each fall. If you suffer from the same condition — and you know who you are — here are some ways to satisfy your pumpkin lust this season.

>> read “Three Ways to Celebrate Fall with Pumpkins”    
Go Out & Look: Winter Scouting for Pests and Diseases

Which plants grew well this year? Which did poorly? Which now have diseases or insects? Now is the time to scout for insects and diseases in the landscape. End-of-the-year scouting is also a great excuse to enjoy a walk through the garden before cold weather sets in.

>> read “Go Out & Look: Winter Scouting for Pests and Diseases”    
Cornucopia - Giving Thanks for the Harvest

If you mention the word “cornucopia,” nearly everyone envisions a pointy basket with fresh fruits and vegetables spilling from its mouth. It’s a common sight this time of the year — autumn, harvest and Thanksgiving — and we see it appearing on everything from greeting cards to decorator items for the home.

>> read “Cornucopia - Giving Thanks for the Harvest”    
 
 
 

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