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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Eastern Baccharis
Baccharis halimifolia

Most gardeners probably don’t consider using our native Eastern baccharis in a home landscape. Often seen on roadsides and clearings, this low-maintenance shrub can make a striking impression on the early to mid-autumn landscape.

>> read “Eastern Baccharis”       #Hot Plants
Flowers that bridge the gap between summer and fall

August is a tough month in many gardens. The blooms of June and July are fading and the asters and mums, traditionally associated with autumn, are not yet flowering. Depending on the year, August can be hot and dry and even the hardiest blooms can appear to be faded, like an old house dress hung out week after week to dry in the sun.

>> read “Flowers that bridge the gap between summer and fall”    
The New Faces of Urban Spaces
Raise Chickens, Rabbits and Goats

The food movement in this country has prompted many to rethink where our food comes from. Economic times have brought people around to giving “growing their own” some serious thought; after all, many remember our parents or grandparents stepping into the backyard and gathering eggs for breakfast or a mess of green beans for dinner or fresh milk from the family cow or goat.

>> read “The New Faces of Urban Spaces”    
10 Most (Un)Wanted Pests and What to Do about Them

They don’t have their photos hanging on the post office walls, but these garden pests are notorious. Here are the ‘Most Wanted’ of the Midwest garden, their rap sheets and how to bring them to justice ...

>> read “10 Most (Un)Wanted Pests and What to Do about Them”    
Gardening Up High
Resplendent green rooftops provide benefits all year

Tall, slender stems of grass swish in the warm summer breezes, while coreopsis and coneflowers bob their heads, as if waving. They and dozens of other plants grow in a diverse garden planted on top of a garage in the middle of St. Louis, Missouri. If a person doesn't look up when walking or driving by, they'll miss seeing it.

>> read “Gardening Up High”    
What to Prune, When?

The sky is clear. The sun is bright. The weather is ideal for pruning. You’ve found pruners, loppers, pruning saw, gloves, paper trash bags and string. Walking around the yard, you scan your garden, trees and shrubs. You’re puzzled. What DO you prune, and WHEN should you prune it?

>> read “What to Prune, When?”    
Daffodil Dividends
Plant fall bulbs now for sweet spring rewards

Yes, spring is still months away, but now is the time to invest in planting spring-blooming daffodils. Just imagine the dividends — early dwarf daffodils blooming in a snow-covered rock garden, a drift of classic yellow daffodils gilding a hillside or clusters of double daffodils brightening an entry walkway. Plus, they’re affordable, low maintenance, hardy throughout most of the U.S. and pest resistant. As its botanical name Narcissus indicates ...

>> read “Daffodil Dividends”    
You Can Eat Your Roses!
And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums …

And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums … there are several beautiful common flowers in your ornamental garden that can add flavor to your food and add color as a garnish. Here’s where to start. Did you know that roses are red and edible too? Well not all roses are red, but they are edible and most definitely delicious too. I didn’t know that until I took a trip to England and Wales in 1999 with two girlfriends on a whirlwind tour of English and Welsh gardens ...

>> read “You Can Eat Your Roses!”    
Facts and Folklore About Late-Blooming Wildflowers

In October, we tend to think the native blooming plants’ seasons are completed. But there are a number of beautiful native wildflowers whose blooms, foliage and seedpods add interest to October and late fall woodlands and prairies. Several species adapt to home gardens and can be found in garden centers or ordered from specialty native plant nurseries. Plus, each has an old story to tell.

>> read “Facts and Folklore About Late-Blooming Wildflowers”       #Flowers
Tools I Can’t Live Without

When you buy the right tools you can make garden maintenance easier (and less painful). Here are a few must-have favorites. Gardening isn’t all joy. Watching the garden evolve and change with the seasons is one of a gardener’s greatest pleasures but the pleasures also entail a lot of work. Therefore, the avid gardener is always searching for tools that will make maintenance easier ...

>> read “Tools I Can’t Live Without”    
New and Unusual Plants to Grow

It’s not too early to start thinking about plants you might want to grow next season. If you look out over this year’s garden area, consider what did well and what you might like to do differently. Most seed catalogs have already gone to print and you’ll start receiving the first ones right after Christmas. Here are a few unusual or so-called “new” plants you might want to try. I’ve had experience growing all of them in Missouri, and I can recommend each one as worthy of including in the garden ...

>> read “New and Unusual Plants to Grow”       #Advice   #Edibles
Grow a Salsa Garden—Everything but Tortilla Chips

If you are a salsa fan, you can grow an edible garden designed specifically to make this spicy sauce. Tomatoes, tomatillos, hot or sweet peppers, onions, cilantro—you can grow it all ...

>> read “Grow a Salsa Garden—Everything but Tortilla Chips”    
 
 
 

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