Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest
by Tammy Weiss

With the cold winter behind and the warm, humid summer just about here, I begin to dream of the tropics, and with that, the full-flavored, juicy fruit whose sweet fragrances fill outdoor markets and lone fruit stands on the side roads. Sadly though, with the economy not cooperating and the present fashion to have stay-cations, I have decided I could and would have both. Thus began my search for the ever-elusive tropical fruits that I could grow in my Kentucky backyard garden.   >> read article
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Scented Geranium
Pelargonium spp.
by Lynda Heavrin

It is summer and we reach for the bug spray, citronella oil or a candle to burn to keep the mosquitos at bay while we enjoy the beautiful evening. As you may know, citronella oil is obtained from citronella-scented geranium (Pelargonium citrosum). However, did you know that there are approximately 150 varieties of scented geranium that are not only beautiful garden plants, but can be used for potpourri and as flavoring in cooking ...   >> read article
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The Fifth Season
by Kylee Baumle

To everything there is a season, it is written, and no one knows this more than gardeners. We cold-climate growers have just wrapped up the biggest one of all – summer – and have enjoyed a pretty luxurious fall. Most of us don’t really look forward to the cold and gray days of winter, but at our house, we celebrate another growing season: The Amaryllis Season.   >> read article
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Planting By Design
Neighboring gardeners with different attitudes
by Cathy Jean Maloney

Here’s my pet theory. All of us gardeners fall into one of two camps: plant lovers or design doyennes. The former waxes eloquent in Latin nomenclature, often with anthropomorphic plant references while using words such as “cultural requirements” and “fastigiated branching.” The design doyennes look for the big picture in the garden and are less concerned with individual plants ...   >> read article
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Weeping Elm
by Joseph Tychonievich

In the summer, the weeping elm (Ulmus glabra ‘Camperdownii’) is quite beautiful, with lush green leaves and a graceful, weeping habit. But the full beauty of this tree is really visible when it disrobes in the fall, the leaves dropping away to expose a glorious network of gnarled, curved branches in an intricate, graceful pattern ...   >> read article
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Urban Myths and Legends in the Garden
by Denise Schreiber

Every gardener has a special secret or method that they have learned from a family member, “The Farmer’s Almanac,” other books and worst of all, the Internet. Usually there is or was a kernel of truth in many of these secret/special methods, but they have since grown into legends, much like passing a piece of gossip along. You know the kind of gossip, “Joe likes Mary,” and a month later, “Joe ran away with Mary and became an astrologer and opened up tattoo parlor in South America.” ...   >> read article
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Tough as Nails
by Carolyn Ulrich

What does your garden have to offer? Wet soil? Dry? Shade? Standing water? Here are some plants that will be happy there. With temperatures that can range from minus 30 to 105 F, the climate in the upper Midwest is a meteorological marvel. Alaska may be colder, but it can’t match us for heat. Saudi Arabia is hotter but rarely sees snow (yes, really; who knew?), let alone a thermometer that plummets to the depths familiar to all of us ...   >> read article
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The Importance of Pollination
by Connie Kingman

There are many organisms involved in the process of pollination: wasps, butterflies, moths, flies, beetles, ants, bats and other mammals, including humans. If there were no pollinators, there would be no gardens. Here are some fascinating facts about pollination ...   >> read article
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