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The newest web article for Ohio Gardener was written by:

Michelle Byrne Walsh

Michelle Byrne Walsh is the Lower Midwest editor at State-by-State Gardening, a master gardener and a member of the Garden Writers Association.

 

 

Smooth Oxeye
Heliopsis helianthoides var. scabra
by Barrett Wilson

Smooth oxeye, also called false sunflower or early sunflower (Heliopsis helianthoides var. scabra) is an herbaceous, clumping perennial native to much of Eastern North America. Found naturally in dry to moist open woods, smooth oxeye is especially known for its long-flowering duration (June through September). The cheery, daisy-like flowers are comprised of yellow to orange-yellow rays surrounding a cone-shaped central disk ...   >> read article
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Double Zahara Fire
Zinnia marylandica ‘Pas553645’
by Mark A. Konlock

Double Zahara Fire and Cherry zinnias make a winning combination ...   >> read article
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A Few Native Plants That We Call Weeds
by Pamela Ruch

Did you know that many of the weeds we pull from our gardens year in and year out are native plants that offer the same benefits as our much-loved butterfly weeds (Asclepias spp.) and coneflowers (Echinacea spp.)? I didn’t, until I resolved to learn more about the rampant volunteers in my garden community. What’s more, we think of Northeast natives as being mainly perennial forbs, shrubs and trees, but there are quite a few very common native annuals underfoot ...   >> read article
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Eastern Baccharis
Baccharis halimifolia
by Barrett Wilson

Most gardeners probably don’t consider using our native Eastern baccharis in a home landscape. Often seen on roadsides and clearings, this low-maintenance shrub can make a striking impression on the early to mid-autumn landscape.   >> read article
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Weeping Elm
by Joseph Tychonievich

In the summer, the weeping elm (Ulmus glabra ‘Camperdownii’) is quite beautiful, with lush green leaves and a graceful, weeping habit. But the full beauty of this tree is really visible when it disrobes in the fall, the leaves dropping away to expose a glorious network of gnarled, curved branches in an intricate, graceful pattern ...   >> read article
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No More Rose Divas
by Linda Kimmel

The rose, queen of all flowers, has a rather haughty reputation: difficult to grow, prone to diseases and pests, and dies after a few years. There are still a few divas around, but many rose varieties are not obstinate or impossible to grow. In the words of Peter Schneider, author of Right Rose, Right Place, “If you can grow a marigold, you can grow a rose.” The rose is one of the most decorative and adaptable of all flowers ...   >> read article
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You Never Get a Second Chance to Make a First Impression
by Karen Atkins

It might be the first thing visitors see — and your postal carrier is very familiar with it — it’s your mailbox. Is it as beautiful as your garden? Here are some tips to plant a garden at your mailbox. Think about it. It is front and center. Yet most people, even great gardeners, completely neglect their mailboxes. With just a little bit of thought and work, you can greatly improve it.   >> read article
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Narrow-Leaf Ironweed
Vernonia lettermannii
by Barrett Wilson

With its profusion of small purple flowers and tolerance of heat and drought, narrow-leaf ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii) is a standout in the late-season perennial border in USDA Zones 4 to 9. Native to dry, rocky flood plains in Arkansas and Oklahoma, narrow-leaf ironweed thrives in almost all soil types, except soggy, heavy soils. In fact, supplemental fertilizers and excessive watering are discouraged in the garden setting ...   >> read article
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