October Articles

Great Fall Color from Perennials and Shrubs

Thieves in Your Garden

Spruce Up Your Sidewalk

Carex ‘Spark Plug’

 

September Articles

Late Fall Blooms for the Midwest Garden

Things to Do and Not to Do in the Garden This Fall

Plant an Awesome Autumn: Trees for Fall Color

Buddleia Buzz Series

 

 

 

 
Ohio Gardener

Thieves in Your Garden
by Pamela Ruch - October 2014

It’s late summer and the garden is abuzz: honeybees on the mint, bumblebees on the sunflowers, hovering flies alighting briefly on the thyme flowers. Inside the rose-of-Sharon blossoms, carpenter bees are scrambling around the pollen-coated stamens with ecstatic abandon, powder-puffing their ample bodies. There may be a pollinator crisis elsewhere, but in my garden there’s plenty of action.   >> read article

Great Fall Color from Perennials and Shrubs
by Debbie Clark - October 2014

Fall is arriving — it is that time of the year when the leaves on our garden plants are starting to change color. With the arrival of shorter days and cooler temperatures many garden plants start to change color from green to beautiful shades of yellow, orange, red or purple. Many of those beautiful colors were already in the leaves, but were masked by the green plant color. As the days shorten, plants know it is time to prepare for the arrival of winter and the green chlorophyll disappears from their leaves to show all those beautiful fall colors.

When you walk in your garden, you may notice that it is starting to look a little bit tired and worn out. Fewer perennials and shrubs are blooming and those that are blooming are starting to look faded, tattered and ready for a long winter’s nap. This is a good time to evaluate your garden design and plantings. If you are noticing that your garden is slowly turning from green to shades of gold and brown, then you may want to consider adding plantings that can give you extra color. There are lots of shrubs and perennials that can keep that garden in color until the first frost arrives.   >> read article

Spruce Up Your Sidewalk
by Kathleen Hennessy - October 2014

Saying goodbye to bland, boring concrete walkways and patios is easier than you think. Adding a little color to your hardscape can help highlight your plants and make the entryway even more inviting ...   >> read article

Carex ‘Spark Plug’
by Kelly D. Norris - October 2014

If you ever needed a reminder of the differences between grasses and sedges, remember what every college botany professor has recited like scripture: sedges have edges. Indeed, the angular nature of their stems makes for easy ID, but as plants go, sedges are edgy.

Riding a wave of popularity thanks to their use in New American garden design, sedges have a lot to offer. They like shade, don’t mind moist soils on occasion, and wonderfully evoke the naturalism of the forests and meadows they come from. Gardeners around the country owe the late landscape architects Wolfgang Oehme and James van Sweden a debt of gratitude for their garden designs that began to celebrate sedges more than 25 years ago.   >> read article

Jump to page:  1 2 3 >  Last »