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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Appreciate the Beneficials

About 96 percent of all bugs you see are beneficial insects. These insects provide plants with protection, help with pollination and keep the bad bug population in check. They’re not only beneficial to plants but they’re also beneficial to gardeners.

>> read “Appreciate the Beneficials”    
Saving Kitty (and Your Sanity)

With delicate noses in the air, some persnickety cats wouldn’t even think about nibbling on a leaf, while other “grazing” felines make it impossible to allow both plant and puss into the same room. Why can’t a cat-loving scientist discover a test that would identify the PN (plant nibbler) gene in kittens? Early detection might let you know what you’re up against. Since there is still no test available, I continue to work on my two-pronged attack: The Deterrent and the Disguise ...

>> read “Saving Kitty (and Your Sanity)”       #Advice   #Health and Safety   #Poisonous Plants
The Grace of Grasses

Ornamental grasses have wonderful textures, colors and silhouettes. They can be included in any garden design, from traditional to modern. Consider adding them to your garden — here is how ...

>> read “The Grace of Grasses”    
Gardening Up High
Resplendent green rooftops provide benefits all year

Tall, slender stems of grass swish in the warm summer breezes, while coreopsis and coneflowers bob their heads, as if waving. They and dozens of other plants grow in a diverse garden planted on top of a garage in the middle of St. Louis, Missouri. If a person doesn't look up when walking or driving by, they'll miss seeing it.

>> read “Gardening Up High”    
Dwarf Mondo Grass
Ophiopogon japonicus ‘Nana’

Dwarf mondo grass (Ophiopogon japonicus ‘Nana’) is not really grass! It’s a miniature member of the lily family, sometimes used as a turf substitute in the Southern states. In Ohio, it serves best as a dense, evergreen, sun- and shade-tolerant ground cover. It is a classic element in traditional Japanese gardens and looks wonderful in formal or modern landscapes as well ...

>> read “Dwarf Mondo Grass”       #Hot Plants
Northern Crapemyrtle
The Summer Show Can Extend Well Beyond the South

As I skimmed through some of the State-by-State Gardening Midwest magazines, it occurred to me that readers in Northern states, for example in Zones 6 and 5 and in even especially warm spots in Zone 4, can, if done properly, grow crepemyrtle (Lagerstroemia indica). I have a test plot in Ft. Atkinson, Wis., and have had crapemyrtle surviving, growing and flowering the last three years. The first year the plants grew ...

>> read “Northern Crapemyrtle”    
Mountainous Molehills

Is mole damage to your lawn and garden causing mounting frustration? Here are the most effective ways to control moles and reduce turf and ornamental bed damage. Most people have never seen a mole, but they are well aware of the damage caused to lawns and ornamental beds ...

>> read “Mountainous Molehills”    
Revive Your Lawn

It took a beating last summer, but don’t despair. There are steps you can take to return your turfgrass to its former glory. Your spring lawn will likely be an enchantress, ready to comfort you in green balm and lull you into forgetting the unattractive persona she wore last August ...

>> read “Revive Your Lawn”    
Site-Sensitive Natives

Just because it’s a native doesn’t mean it will be happy wherever you plant it. There are a lot of terrific reasons to grow native plants, but the most-cited reasons are not necessarily the best. There is little doubt that natives are hot. From two-minute TV segments to print media and even garden club lectures, you can’t avoid the message: “Grow native plants because they are easier, need less water and care and are better for the environment.” But is it true ...

>> read “Site-Sensitive Natives”    
‘Everest’ Weeping Sedge
Carex oshimensis

If you don’t know sedges, then you’re missing out on one of the best plants to grow in Indiana in the shaded or woodland garden. Not just because it’s deer resistant, although that reason alone would be proof of its superior value in the landscape.

>> read “‘Everest’ Weeping Sedge”       #Hot Plants
‘Ruby Falls’ Redbud
Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’

Gardeners hungry for great plants in small spaces will quickly welcome the ‘Ruby Falls’ weeping redbud (Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’) into their landscapes.

‘Ruby Falls’, bred at North Carolina State University from other purple-leafed redbuds ‘Covey’ and ‘Forest Pansy’, has the strong pink flowers of its parents – and their deep purple to shiny burgundy leaves that fade to green.

>> read “‘Ruby Falls’ Redbud”       #Hot Plants
New and Unusual Plants to Grow

It’s not too early to start thinking about plants you might want to grow next season. If you look out over this year’s garden area, consider what did well and what you might like to do differently. Most seed catalogs have already gone to print and you’ll start receiving the first ones right after Christmas. Here are a few unusual or so-called “new” plants you might want to try. I’ve had experience growing all of them in Missouri, and I can recommend each one as worthy of including in the garden ...

>> read “New and Unusual Plants to Grow”       #Advice   #Edibles
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Green Dragon
Arisaemia dracontium - rare woodland plant

[+] The Everlasting Gardener