Home Grown Citrus
Grow Your Own Cold Hardy, Sweet Or Sour Fruit
by Jason Powell

Late fall and winter mean many things to us as gardeners. There are trees to be planted, catalogs to read, soil to be amended and if you are fortunate, oranges, lemons and kumquats to be eaten.   >> read article
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Sky flower
Thunbergia grandiflora
by P. J. Gartin

Sky flower (Thunbergia grandiflora) packs a late summer color punch just when our gardens desperately need one. In late July or early August, just as the crapemyrtle blossoms start to fade and zinnias begin to melt away, this vine produces glorious clusters of 3-inch-wide, periwinkle-blue flowers. As if caught in a perpetual yawn, these bell-shaped blossoms show off creamy white or buttery yellow throats.   >> read article
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Let’s Stop Pruning with “Shear” Ignorance
by Bonnie Lee Appleton

What’s one of the most obvious and common mistakes made in landscapes anywhere in the southern U.S.? Improper pruning or excessive shearing (though it’s stretching the definition of pruning) of shrubs. Nothing jumps out of a landscape faster than a once graceful, natural-form shrub that has been sheared into a mathematician’s delight – be it round, square, pyramidal or rectangular. From a horticultural standpoint, unnecessary, form-damaging shearing of shrubs is almost as criminal as the topping of trees.   >> read article
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Keeping Caladiums
Getting Them Ready for Next Year
by Allen Owings

Caladiums generally begin to decline in late September or October, and then it’s time to decide what you want to do with them. If the bed where the caladiums are planted will stay relatively undisturbed and continue to drain well, you may have luck by simply leaving the caladium tubers in the ground. Keep the area mulched this winter to protect the tubers. If your ground doesn’t freeze, they will probably survive and come back up next year and provide a beautiful display.   >> read article
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A Hotbed of Ideas
Try These Flowerbed Ideas In Your Own Landscape
by Anita Stamper

Try These Flowerbed Ideas In Your Own Landscape   >> read article
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How Dry I Am
by Bob Brzuszek

Last year was a tough one – for people and plants. The U.S. Drought Monitor for 2010 shows that the Southern United States was in abnormally dry conditions for most of the year. And this is an area that normally averages over 50 inches of rainfall a year. In fact, it was so dry that cows were giving evaporated milk. The extreme lack of rainfall was bad enough, but coupled with record high summer temperatures for most of the eastern U.S., it was literally a killer. Especially in my garden.   >> read article
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Alien Invaders
Battling Invasive Species
by Joyce Mendenhall

Have you checked your backyard lately? You may be harboring dangerous aliens. No, these are not creatures from outer space. The aliens I’m referring to are plants – exotic plants. Also referred to as foreign, non-indigenous, introduced or nonnative, these invasive exotics are noxious weeds according to the following definition: A noxious weed is a plant alien to a geographical area whose presence threatens natural and agricultural ecosystems. Like their science fiction counterparts, these weeds are a major threat.   >> read article
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Russian Bees
Helping Out the Bee Population and Gardeners
by Jack Horan

The Russians are coming! The Russians are coming! To the nearest beehive in your neighborhood, that is. In fact, the Russian honeybees are already here. They’re buzzing around meadows and gardens around the Southeast, pollinating crops and flowers, gathering nectar and making honey for beekeepers.   >> read article
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