Lynn Rogers is a former high school biology and Spanish teacher. She is a Washington County Master Gardener, a garden writer and a singer in her church choir. She is a proponent of organic gardening and is a plant collector.
 

 

After the wedding, I’ve returned to the garden.
by Lynn Rogers - posted 06/12/12


Siloam Springs late hybridizer, Pauline Henry, often named her seedlings after friends, like Mitch Singleton her eye doctor

Our oldest granddaughter was married in our garden on June 2nd this year. Much preparation went into getting ready for that event. It was lovely and the weather cooperated. Now I make my daily rounds to see what daylilies have opened and other true lilies, like orienpets and asiatics. Color is everywhere.

 Madonna Lily bulbs (similar to these orienpets)  were carried by Roman soldiers to treat blistered feet.

This orienpet is five feet tall and slightly  fragrant.

The coral orienpet (oriental x trumpet) is 4 feet tall, with flowers 10 inches across.

Hemerocallis citrina is a species daylily that is nocturnal. The fragrance is as sweet and strong as a gardenia.

My newest daylily with an unusual color combination is  Fried Eggplant from Lilyland in Texarkana.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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