Lynn Rogers is a former high school biology and Spanish teacher. She is a Washington County Master Gardener, a garden writer and a singer in her church choir. She is a proponent of organic gardening and is a plant collector.
 

 

Fayetteville Square flowers offer stunning color combinations
by Lynn Rogers - posted 10/19/12

A recent afternoon stroll around the Square yielded some wonderful photos of plants combinations. Also, a black-leafed ornamental pepper really caught my eye, so I’ll have to have ‘Black Pearl’ for my garden. It will have to be grown as an annual. Their use of the flame flower vine, Senecio confusus, was so beautiful. Enjoy!

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Portraits of outstanding fall-blooming plants.
by Lynn Rogers - posted 09/27/12

 

 

 

Obedient plant blooms bountifully.
 
Ivy-leaved cyclamen, C. hederifolium, is only 4 inches tall but its bright color makes it a stand-out.
 
Japanese anemone ‘Andrea Atkinson’ forms a large colony about 5 feet wide.
 
Very reliable sedum flowers change from pink to deep russet.
 
Narrow-leaf Sunflower is a bright exclamation point in the fall garden.
 
This aster is very fragrant and climbs up to 8 feet.
 
‘October Skies’ native aster
 
This toad lily, Miyazaki, shows some atypical coloration

 

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Cooler temps give relief to plants and gardeners.
by Lynn Rogers - posted 08/14/12

With temps in the 90s and a little rain, my garden seems to be breathing a sigh of relief. Many plants are blooming again. Most of my roses are in full bloom which I didn't expect until fall. My brown turkey fig, on the patio, is bearing fruit too. They have an opening on the end which ants love to take advantage of, so I put a little plug of vaseline there and problem solved.

 
Brown turkey figs are my favorite because they remind of the bush that grew in my Grandmother Brockett's yard.
Also in the patio area is a bodacious Hibiscus grandiflora or Swamp Hibiscus. It has huge velvety green leaves and pink fragrant flowers. It was often grown beside the outhouse, for obvious reasons. It was also called The Outhouse Rose.
 
Outhouse Hibiscus
Grown for its fragrance and soft velvety leaves.
 
 
A beautiful hibiscus from my friend, Russell Studebaker. It is very tall with 5-6" blooms. The dark pink hibsicus is H. mutabilis 'Rubrum'.
 
 
A favorite hibiscus for hummingbirds, Turk's Cap Mallow, a native wildflower,  Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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