recentauthor
The newest web article for State-by-State Gardening was written by:

Ruth Mason McElvain

Ruth Mason McElvain, retired English teacher, blogger, gardener and writer, lives in upstate SC, blissfully repatriated to her native South after 40 years in California.

 

 

Christmas from Nature
by Anita Stamper

Decorating from nature doesn’t require lists of instructions or rules; in fact, some of the simplest materials and compositions yield beautiful results. Children often make simple ornaments in school from natural objects such as walnut shells or dried seedpods.   >> read article
Comments (6) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Plenty of Pecans for the Holidays
by Norman Winter

California has its almonds and Florida its citrus. But from Thanksgiving through Christmas, the southern U.S. has its own legendary horticultural crop: the pecan ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Turn A Drainage Ditch Into A Dandy Display
by Patrice Peltier

“It was a jungle back there,” Schmidt says. And she was afraid her husband would get killed mowing a very steep slope. People pay good money to have a water feature like she had running through the backyard. She wondered, “Why can’t I do something with that?” Regulatory issues, erosion and water quality concerns will likely be challenges when converting a ditch into a garden, no matter where you live in the Midwest ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Problem or Opportunity
by Mary Lou McFarland

Many gardeners tend to view landscaping problems first as a challenge, and then as an opportunity. The thought of transforming an uninviting eyesore into a functional and beautiful garden area causes a rush of excitement. Being able to also trade high maintenance for low maintenance puts many gardeners in a state of euphoria. Yes, gardeners tend to be “glass-half-full” kind of folks.   >> read article
Comments (1) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Fall Cleanup Tips
5 Simple Steps to Minimize Plant Diseases in the Spring
by Holly Thornton

One of the most daunting garden tasks is fall cleanup. Most gardeners have spent the majority of the spring and summer planting, watering, fertilizing, weeding and, of course, bragging on their gardens to their friends, neighbors and family. When fall arrives, it’s time to enjoy some R & R… or so you thought ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Edible Chrysanthemum
They're yellow and they're tasty. Try the Chrysanthemum
by Mengmeng Gu

Every family in the Gu's village where I spent my childhood had a row of edible chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum nankingense) along the north side of their house and very close to the wall. Starting in early summer we pick the tender tips, about 1 inch long, and use them in stir-fry or soup. It has a very refreshing taste. This continues until early or midfall, depending on whether we want flowers. Picking encourages more growing tips (and flowers later on) and keeps the plant short and rounded. It flowers in late fall if picking stops around early fall. In late fall, tons of tiny, 1/2 inch golden yellow flowers cover and fill the plant. [Edible chrysanthemum brings sunshine to the landscape in late fall.] Edible chrysanthemum is the most shade-tolerant and pruning-tolerant chrysanthemum that I have ever seen. It not only flowers on the outside, but also the inside of the plant canopy, probably because of its shade tolerance.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Is THIS Poison Ivy?
by Charlotte Kidd

Several weeks ago, poison ivy horticulturist Umar Mycka and I were driving to Longwood Gardens to do training about poison ivy. “Look at that,” said Mycka, pointing to the right. I saw a tall privet hedge overhanging a public sidewalk by half. He'd spotted huge leaves of poison ivy waving from deep inside the shrub ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Herb in Autumn
by Cindy Martin

What should I do with my herbs for the winter? Will they all die? Should I bring them all indoors? These are the most frequently asked questions about herb gardening this time of year. Herb gardening does not necessarily stop as soon as the basil flowers and goes to seed. Fall is a good time for cleanup in the herb garden and growing can continue indoors once the weather cools off to ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Jump to page: « First  <  13 14 15 16 17 >  Last »