Growing Microgreens
by Carol Michel

If you are looking for a winter crop that is easy to grow indoors and adds freshness and nutrition to many dishes, grow microgreens. Microgreens are the seedlings of many of the greens and other vegetables we commonly grow in the garden, harvested when the plants have grown just one set of true leaves ...   >> read article
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Thought for Food: Planning Perfect Produce
by Jan Riggenbach

Winter in Iowa is tailor-made for solving problems in the vegetable garden – before they begin. Our long cold nights are perfect for curling up in your favorite chair with garden books, magazines and the new crop of seed catalogs. Start by choosing troublefree varieties ...   >> read article
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Standing Up to Salt
by Deb Terrill

It’s no accident that a list of salt-tolerant plants reads a bit like a list of seaside plants. Without even looking at lists of such plants compiled by arboretums and universities, I can begin my own list from memory. Past walks along the coast of Cape Cod provide me with a mental image of plants that live in constant sea spray ...   >> read article
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Prevent Mint From Taking Over the Garden
by Trish Joseph

Mint is remarkably easy to grow under most conditions. It thrives in moist, well-drained soil, in sun or partial shade. The drier the soil, the more shade it prefers. Mint is incredibly vigorous and drought resistant. It can die back after blooming in the hot dry summer and reappear lush and thriving in the fall ...   >> read article
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The Growing, Thriving Permaculture Movement
by Amy McDowell

My friend Masha lived in Russia for several years when the grocery store shelves were completely bare of food for several years. Everyone, she said, rode public transportation into the countryside to tend his or her own small plot of land. They boarded the busses together, tools in hand. And on the ride home, they carried bags of produce. They grew and preserved everything they needed to feed their families ...   >> read article
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Spring Ahead
by Betsy Lyman

Spring is coming and with it one of the busiest times in the garden. Even though your last frost date may be weeks away, there are some key things you can do now so when the season kicks into high gear, you’ll feel like you’re ready ...   >> read article
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Saving Kitty (and Your Sanity)
by Susan Randstrom Bruck

With delicate noses in the air, some persnickety cats wouldn’t even think about nibbling on a leaf, while other “grazing” felines make it impossible to allow both plant and puss into the same room. Why can’t a cat-loving scientist discover a test that would identify the PN (plant nibbler) gene in kittens? Early detection might let you know what you’re up against. Since there is still no test available, I continue to work on my two-pronged attack: The Deterrent and the Disguise ...   >> read article
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The Power of the Edit
by Scott Beuerlein

From a design perspective, at times we need to reacquaint ourselves with the notion that — sometimes — less is more. As gardeners, we know and value the importance of diversity. It’s a good thing, too. Each year, new varieties of everything flood the market, and we are encouraged to try them all ...   >> read article
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