You Can Eat Your Roses!
And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums …
by Denise Schreiber

And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums … there are several beautiful common flowers in your ornamental garden that can add flavor to your food and add color as a garnish. Here’s where to start. Did you know that roses are red and edible too? Well not all roses are red, but they are edible and most definitely delicious too. I didn’t know that until I took a trip to England and Wales in 1999 with two girlfriends on a whirlwind tour of English and Welsh gardens ...   >> read article
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No More Rose Divas
by Linda Kimmel

The rose, queen of all flowers, has a rather haughty reputation: difficult to grow, prone to diseases and pests, and dies after a few years. There are still a few divas around, but many rose varieties are not obstinate or impossible to grow. In the words of Peter Schneider, author of Right Rose, Right Place, “If you can grow a marigold, you can grow a rose.” The rose is one of the most decorative and adaptable of all flowers ...   >> read article
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Daffodil Dividends
Plant fall bulbs now for sweet spring rewards
by Teresa Woodard

Yes, spring is still months away, but now is the time to invest in planting spring-blooming daffodils. Just imagine the dividends — early dwarf daffodils blooming in a snow-covered rock garden, a drift of classic yellow daffodils gilding a hillside or clusters of double daffodils brightening an entry walkway. Plus, they’re affordable, low maintenance, hardy throughout most of the U.S. and pest resistant. As its botanical name Narcissus indicates ...   >> read article
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10 Power Performers in the Perennial Garden
by Kylee Baumle

To every flower there is a season. As winter breathes its last breath, the spring bulbs put on a show of color that gardeners and non-gardeners alike welcome as much as the warmer temperatures. The bright yellows, purples and reds of daffodils, tulips and other ephemerals carry us into early summer, when a whole new wave of color greets us ...   >> read article
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Mixing It Up with Cool Cosmos: Notes from My Garden Journal
by Chris Eirschele

Amid the autumn plantings, gardeners record plant ideas onto new journal pages this time of year. Cosmos found a way into my writings some time ago, and never left ...   >> read article
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Build a Better Rose Garden
by Nicole Juday

Roses have been cultivated for many centuries, but according to legend it was Empress Josephine who created the modern rose garden. Her ambition was to acquire every known variety, and her collection was laid out in orderly rows. Now 200 years later, many rose gardens are still planted out in this style ...   >> read article
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Small Spring-Flowering Trees
by Scott A. Zanon

This is the time of year when you notice all the blooming trees — they just seem to pop out of the landscape. Maybe it is time you added one or two (or all of them!) to your garden.   >> read article
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Primula for the Midwest: Five Easy Favorites
by Gene E. Bush

Primrose, cowslip, oxslip — no matter what you call them, these old-fashioned favorites are easy-to-grow early spring bloomers. Here a few to consider for your own shady garden.   >> read article
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