Common Diseases of Landscape Trees & Shrubs
by Douglas A. Spilker, Ph.D.

What’s that spot on the leaves? Or that fuzzy stuff? Why are the leaves falling off? Here’s how to tell whether your woody plants are really sick or just have a little case of fungus.   >> read article
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Boxelder tree
Acer negundo
by LeeAnn Barton

Acer negundo has a large native range throughout the southern and midwestern United States as well as parts of Canada. Usually found in bottomland forests and populating old homesteads. Its tolerance to extreme cold and drought has made this tree a survivor through much of the U.S. It can be used as a temporary planting, providing fast growth and shade while slower growing trees gain maturity. Wide, relatively shallow roots are perfect for erosion control.   >> read article
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Trumpet Spurflower
Rabdosia longituba
by Sue Speichert

My husband assigned to me the responsibility of watering all the plants in our home garden. This was no light task, since we always had more plants in pots than we had plants in the ground, and in the heat of summer, many of the potted plants had to be watered at least once, if not twice, every day.   >> read article
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Sustainability: Right Plant, Right Place
by Maria Zampini

A sustainable garden is a plant community that takes care of itself. By using the right plants in the right place, you can have a low- or no-maintenance landscape that is also eco-friendly.   >> read article
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Sitting in the Garden
by Denise Schreiber

Our lives are so hectic anymore, working late, attending functions, running children to softball, hockey, dance and wherever they need to be that we have forgotten some of the simple pleasures of life that make us happy.   >> read article
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Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’
Lagerstroemia (indica x fauriei) ‘Pocomoke’
by Charlotte Kidd

Do you enjoy the late-season flowers of crapemyrtle but don’t have space for a tree? Allow me to introduce you to ‘Pocomoke’—a handsome, dwarf crapemyrtle. It’s not quite knee-high—a densely branched mound of deep rosy-raspberry flowers floating above forest-green leaves.   >> read article
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The Gall of it All
by Douglas A. Spilker, Ph.D.

Galls are the enlargement of plant tissue caused by injury or irritation by parasitic organisms such as insects, mites, nematodes, fungi and bacteria. They are also interesting looking — knotty, lumpy and sometimes colorful. Learn which ones are common in your garden.   >> read article
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Eastern Baccharis
Baccharis halimifolia
by Barrett Wilson

Most gardeners probably don’t consider using our native Eastern baccharis in a home landscape. Often seen on roadsides and clearings, this low-maintenance shrub can make a striking impression on the early to mid-autumn landscape.   >> read article
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