Wilted Rainbow Chard Recipe
by Karen Atkins

There are many recipes for wilted chard in which the greens are sautéed and then simmered in stock until they are extremely tender. This is not that kind of recipe. To retain the crunch, freshness, and color, just gently warm the chard in oil you’ve infused with flavor. Serves four.   >> read article
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Savory Okra Pickles Recipe
by Ruth Mason McElvain

For this recipe, you need six very clean wide-mouth pint jars, sterilized as directed by manufacturer, 6 lids and 6 bands separated into a shallow pot of boiling hot water ...   >> read article
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New and Unusual Plants to Grow
by Jim Long

It’s not too early to start thinking about plants you might want to grow next season. If you look out over this year’s garden area, consider what did well and what you might like to do differently. Most seed catalogs have already gone to print and you’ll start receiving the first ones right after Christmas. Here are a few unusual or so-called “new” plants you might want to try. I’ve had experience growing all of them in Missouri, and I can recommend each one as worthy of including in the garden ...   >> read article
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All-America Selections Winners Take All
by Denise Schreiber

This is the time of year that dedicated gardeners sort through their catalogs picking out their seeds for the upcoming planting season. I’m sure that you have noticed a little identifying mark on a seed packet that says “AAS.” That means it is an All-America Selection that has been grown in more than 30 trial gardens all over the United State and Canada ...   >> read article
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New and Unusual Varieties to Try
Grow something new and tasty this year.
by Carol Michel

Does the thought of growing the same vegetable varieties you grew last year leave you a bit bored and complacent about your vegetable garden? Are you ready to try some new varieties of veggies this spring? If so, you need to start planning now so when spring arrives, you’ll be ready to try something in your garden.   >> read article
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Edible Fig
Ficus carica
by Charlotte Kidd

Though we wouldn’t plant a fig tree (Ficus carica) outdoors with winter coming, we certainly can buy one to grow indoors then plant outside in the spring. With global climate change and the USDA Planting Zone adjustments, some fig varieties will thrive where before they’d likely have died in temperatures below 10 F ...   >> read article
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You Can Eat Your Roses!
And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums …
by Denise Schreiber

And your daylilies, pansies, nasturtiums … there are several beautiful common flowers in your ornamental garden that can add flavor to your food and add color as a garnish. Here’s where to start. Did you know that roses are red and edible too? Well not all roses are red, but they are edible and most definitely delicious too. I didn’t know that until I took a trip to England and Wales in 1999 with two girlfriends on a whirlwind tour of English and Welsh gardens ...   >> read article
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Perennial Vegetables
by Laura Mathews

Now that it is February, we move from seed catalog season to seed starting season. While planning our spring gardens, why not ponder a permanent addition to the garden? Consider adding perennial edibles vegetables that inexpensively produce novel and delectable foods year after year while expanding the harvest season in the garden ...   >> read article
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