Muhly grass
Muhlenbergia capillaris
by Allen Owings

One of the native ornamental grasses that has received a considerable amount of attention the past few years is muhly grass. Not likely to be noticed in the spring and summer, it puts on quite a show in the landscape during the fall.   >> read article
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Bonfire Begonias
Enliven your spring patio and landscape.
by Elena Fennell

Enliven your spring patio and landscape with Bonfire begonias. Their shocking scarlet-orange blossoms easily light up canopied beds and containers as profusions of dainty bells elegantly hang from arching blue-green limbs. Perfect for hanging baskets or mixed containers, Bonfire begonias stand only 18 inches in height, as their swooping stems gracefully cascade downward, creating a remarkable fountain of fiery orange. Heat up your containers with innovative varieties like Bonfire Choc Orange or Bonfire Choc Pink to enjoy cinnamon red and cotton candy blooms, lavishly infused with rich, chocolate mocha leaves.   >> read article
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‘Appalachian Red’ Redbud
by C. Dwayne Jones

The eastern redbud has long been a staple for southern gardeners and when the delicate flowers fill the forest edges, warmer weather is just a whisper away. While the eastern redbud’s popularity remains strong, there have been a host of newcomers hitting the streets in the last few years. One of my personal favorites is Cercis canadensis ‘Appalachian Red’ or the Appalachian red redbud.   >> read article
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White Fringe Tree
a.k.a. Grancy Graybeard or Old Man’s Beard
by Peter Gallagher

White fringe tree also answers to the names grancy graybeard and old man’s beard. It is a member of the Oleaceae (olive) family, along with forsythia, ash (Fraxinus), olive (Olea) and lilac (Syringa).   >> read article
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Persian shield
A stunning foliage plant from the Victorian era.
by Phillip Oliver

Persian shield is a stunning foliage plant that once you grow it, you’ll want it in your garden every year. Native to Burma (Myanmar), it was a popular plant during the Victorian era and is regaining popularity after the University of Georgia reintroduced it a few years ago. This plant loves heat and humidity and doesn’t start growing well until days start to get warmer.   >> read article
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Cardoon
A plant that really shines in the winter. Try one today!
by Andy Cabe

The cardoon is a fabulous plant that can provide plenty of interest in your garden. Cardoons form a rosette of deeply lobed, nearly 3-foot long silvery leaves. Mature specimens can reach upwards of 5 feet tall, so it is easy to see how this plant can make an impact. While the cardoon is truly an evergreen perennial for us in the piedmont of South Carolina, it really shines during the winter. We typically use cardoon at Riverbanks as a winter-interest plant, often using it as an annual to give some size and texture to winter bedding schemes.   >> read article
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