The Potting Shed: A Place to Begin
by Denise Pugh

A place for everything and everything in its place: A playhouse, a winter sanctuary, a herbarium, an atrium and a structural winter solstice are all descriptions I have given to my “potting shed.” I have been a gardener since childhood, but it wasn’t until after my husband and I built our home I realized the need for a potting shed. I was spending a great amount of time walking to his shop to gather my gardening “things” before I could start on my project for the day.   >> read article
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Building Garden Art Using Ferro-cement
by Gerald Klingaman

Garden art is important in every garden but not everyone has the budget to commission pieces in bronze or marble. And, if you have an artistic vision it is not always easy to find just the right piece. But, if you have minimal artistic skill and a bit of perseverance, you can build your own garden additions using a technique called ferro-cement construction. Ferro-cement projects can be built in any shape or size. All it consists of is a steel frame (called an armature) covered with two or more layers of cement.   >> read article
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Veggies Front & Center
by Kate Copsey

Many gardeners would like to grow fruits and vegetables but do not have a sunny backyard. Why not use the sunny front yard? It is possible to raise edibles in the front garden and still keep your curb appeal.
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Your First Herb Garden
by Jim Long

According to the National Garden Bureau 2010 saw more first-time gardeners than any time in recent history. Statistics reveal many of these first-time gardeners began with vegetables and plan to add herbs in the coming year. I’ve been growing herbs since childhood, and to me vegetables are interesting, but adding herbs makes them exciting. Tomatoes, for example, are wonderful fresh, but when cooked, they just cry out for some basil, garlic and oregano. Herbs add flavor and pizzazz to vegetables, fish, poultry, even cheese or egg dishes. Herbs are also incredibly easy to grow provided you follow a few basics.   >> read article
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Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest
by Tammy Weiss

With the cold winter behind and the warm, humid summer just about here, I begin to dream of the tropics, and with that, the full-flavored, juicy fruit whose sweet fragrances fill outdoor markets and lone fruit stands on the side roads. Sadly though, with the economy not cooperating and the present fashion to have stay-cations, I have decided I could and would have both. Thus began my search for the ever-elusive tropical fruits that I could grow in my Kentucky backyard garden.   >> read article
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No Fuss…No Till
by Beth Botts

A growing number of experts say annual tilling is unnecessary—maybe even harmful. Here’s why. Garden wisdom has long held that preparing a vegetable garden means yearly tilling: digging to mix up the top 6 or 8 inches of soil and incorporate new organic matter such as compost to increase its fertility.   >> read article
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The New Faces of Urban Spaces
Raise Chickens, Rabbits and Goats
by Cindy Shapton

The food movement in this country has prompted many to rethink where our food comes from. Economic times have brought people around to giving “growing their own” some serious thought; after all, many remember our parents or grandparents stepping into the backyard and gathering eggs for breakfast or a mess of green beans for dinner or fresh milk from the family cow or goat.   >> read article
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Zen Gardens
A Place For Harmony And Balance
by Claudia C. Swanson

It seems that now, more than ever, people are trying especially hard to make their busy lives less stressful and more meaningful. Gardening can help in a subtle way that few other activities can manage, and the guiding principles of Zen gardening can lead to the creation of a truly calming, harmonious, and uplifting environment. These gardens are not designed to excite the senses in the way that Western plots do but are places for the spirit to find peace and tranquility in which to grow. Zen Buddhism requires that every task is performed with love – and it is the love and care that is put into them that gives them a serene and kindly atmosphere.   >> read article
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