Don’t Cry ‘Uncle’ When You See Ants
by Douglas A. Spilker

Ants are good guys in the garden, but bad guys in the house. Learn more about these colony-dwelling insects.

Whether it is a lone ant wandering the countertop or a column on a mission, an ant invasion can be unnerving. Landscaping with organic mulches, movement away from broadcast applications of lawn insecticides and recent mild winters seem to have increased the encounters with these unwelcome visitors.   >> read article
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The Perils of Beneficial Insects
by Larry Caplan

So you think that beneficial insects are the answer to all your pest problems? Then gather 'round, my children, and hear the twisted tale of "The Praying Mantises that Almost Took Over Evansville ..."   >> read article
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10 Most (Un)Wanted Pests and What to Do about Them
by Douglas A. Spilker, Ph.D.

They don’t have their photos hanging on the post office walls, but these garden pests are notorious. Here are the ‘Most Wanted’ of the Midwest garden, their rap sheets and how to bring them to justice ...   >> read article
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Oh, Deer! 10 Tips for Keeping Deer out of Your Garden
by Ilene Sternberg

A small herd of hungry deer —or even just a couple — can wipe out entire hosta beds, rows of hedges, swaths of daylilies and tulips and eat all of your roses. Close your garden “salad bar” by using several of these tips ...   >> read article
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Mountainous Molehills
by Brad S. Fresenburg

Is mole damage to your lawn and garden causing mounting frustration? Here are the most effective ways to control moles and reduce turf and ornamental bed damage. Most people have never seen a mole, but they are well aware of the damage caused to lawns and ornamental beds ...   >> read article
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The Gall of it All
by Douglas A. Spilker, Ph.D.

Galls are the enlargement of plant tissue caused by injury or irritation by parasitic organisms such as insects, mites, nematodes, fungi and bacteria. They are also interesting looking — knotty, lumpy and sometimes colorful. Learn which ones are common in your garden.   >> read article
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