Super-Sized Sculptures
by Kelly Bledsoe

Throughout the years, I have explored and taken pictures of lots and lots of gardens. I am always amazed and intrigued by the personal touches gardeners add, and lately my eyes have been drawn to selectively placed, oversized sculptures.

These super-sized sculptures seem to have a calming effect and perhaps this is why I am so drawn to them in my perpetually chaotic life. These larger-than-life sculptures strategically situated in the garden, without distraction from nearby plants, structures or any other elements, have captured my interest and a good bit of my spare time ...   >> read article
Comments (1) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Focal-Point Plants
by Shannon Pable

Have you ever wondered why some gardens suck you in, transporting you to another dimension, your curiosity pulling you around every corner, while others have about as much interest as your sock drawer, leaving no lasting impression? What element is missing?

A focal point is that element that is used to draw your eye into the garden. Your gaze will stop at this element. Then your eye will travel to adjacent plants and details that you may not have noticed otherwise. Having a series of focal points, each just visible from a distance, will help guide you through the garden, from one garden room to the next.

What makes a plant a focal point? It could be form, color or texture, something that catches your eye that is unique from anything else surrounding it. It is large enough to stand on its own, but you must be mindful of scale. If it’s too small for the “garden room,” it will not be noticed. And if it’s too large, it will completely overpower the garden and be out of balance. You will want to select a plant that has year-round interest unless it’s used in a garden area that is only visited during a particular season, such as summer ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Fall Gardening Strategies
by Randel A. Agrella

The summer garden is largely finished and your fall crops are growing nicely, but there’s still plenty to do: Winter is on its way and doing the right work now can really put you ahead next spring. The life in your garden may slow down during winter, but never absolutely ceases. So why not use your garden’s downtime to your advantage? You can, with a range of fall gardening strategies.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

The Joys of Garden Journaling
by Pam Ruch

Once the explosion that is summer comes to a screeching halt, gardeners are susceptible to “garden fatigue.” Ah, but fall is for reflection — on the successes and failures of the year’s garden, on the “bones” of the landscape, on the cyclical nature of life. It is a time for slowing down, observing, writing snippets of poetry. It is the perfect time to start a garden journal.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Harvesting and Storing Veggies and Fruits
Save the garden’s best to brighten winter.
by Charlotte Kidd

My neighbor, we call him “Farmer Mel,” does something I find baffling. He practices serious delayed gratification. Throughout summer and into fall, he freezes about 50 quarts of homegrown, luscious, sweet, red, ripe raspberries. He, his wife, grown kids and grandkids enjoy them all winter.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Organize a Plant Swap
by Martha Walsworth

Plant swaps are a fun, organized way to share an abundance of plants. It is also a good way to make sure you have new varieties of plants that you want without having to buy them.

Here are some suggested guidelines for organizing a plant swap.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

It’s All the Buzz: Basic Beekeeping
Ever considered keeping bees in your garden?
by Charlotte Ekker Wiggins

Spurred by worldwide honeybee declines, more gardeners are learning how to keep honeybees. Overuse of pesticides, diseases and disappearing habitat have all contributed to honeybees’ record losses since 2006, when historically-stable U.S. honeybee populations first plummeted.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Get Your Green Fix
by Lisa Eldred Steinkopf

Now that fall has arrived and there are fewer garden chores, you may be wondering what to do now. If you miss taking care of plants, purchase a houseplant to get your green fix inside. Houseplants not only add some green, but some believe that houseplants may improve your mood.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Jump to page:  <  1 2 3 4 >  Last »