American Persimmon
Diospyros virginiana
by Ann McCulloh

American persimmon (Diospyros virginiana) is a native fruit tree that grows in clearings and open woods from Connecticut to Florida with naturally occurring populations in the southern half of Ohio. A slow-growing, ornamental tree with attractive foliage, fall color and bark, it is adaptable to a range of soils and has few pest or disease problems ...   >> read article
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‘Ogon’ Spirea
Spiraea thunbergii ‘Ogon’
by June Hutson

Spiraea thunbergii ‘Ogon’ is a dense, twiggy, upright, multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with wiry, outward-arching branching. It typically grows 3 to 5 feet tall and as wide, often becoming somewhat open and leggy over time. ‘Ogon’ is a golden-leaved variety ...   >> read article
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Cypress ‘Blue Ice’
by Alice Longfellow

An evergreen that offers a unique color and texture for the winter landscape is the ‘Blue Ice’ cypress, or Cupressus arizonica var. glabra ‘Blue Ice’. The lacey texture of the silver-blue scaly needles is one of the main features of this small evergreen tree. Because of its unique color, ‘Blue Ice’ cypress can be used as a focal point. Other plants with rich shades of green will blend nicely with this icy blue tree ...   >> read article
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Ficus benjamina as a Bonsai Plant
Ficus benjamina
by Lynda Heavrin

Bonsai (pronounced BONE-sigh) plants are one of the fastest selling items in our Botanical Conservatory’s Gift Shop. The plants make great gifts and are small enough that they will fit into any brightly lit space. The bonsai are created by members of the local Bonsai Club who volunteer at our greenhouse. Ficus benjamina is the plant they use for most of their bonsai and recommend for first-timers. Creating a bonsai is considered an art, and the plants require more care than the average houseplant, but with minimal input you will be successful ...   >> read article
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ColorBlaze Keystone Kopper Coleus
by Alice Longfellow

The perfect annual for fall gardens, ColorBlaze Keystone Kopper coleus has unique coloring that blends well with many different plant combinations. It looks great with orange, gold, bronze and salmon, yet the purple highlights on the new growth tips contrast nicely with the copper-colored foliage. Use in fall container combinations or as an accent plant in flowerbeds and borders ...   >> read article
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Blue Sedge
Carex glauca ‘Blue Zinger’
by June Hutson

This carex is easily grown in medium to wet soils. Ideal light is shade to part shade. Many members of the genus share the common name of rush or sedge. The cultivar ‘Blue Zinger’ refers to the bright blue color of the leaves, which endures winter in all but the coldest temperatures ...   >> read article
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Korean Chrysanthemum
Dendranthema zawadskii
by Ann McCulloh

The warm, soft tints of Korean chrysanthemum (Dendranthema zawadsii) flowers create a color counterpoint to fall foliage in the October garden. Korean chrysanthemums are later-booming and have a softer form than typical garden mums. The foliage of Korean mums forms an attractive mounding shape all season long ...   >> read article

Morgan Oriental Arborvitae
Thuja orientalis ’Morgan’
by Bob Hill

The very rare, “nearly perfect” plant in the landscape, the compact Morgan Oriental arborvitae (Thuja orientalis ‘Morgan’) is slow-growing to 3 to 4 feet and offers shimmering lime-green foliage in the summer. Foliage turns to an attractive burgundy-orange color in the fall — beginning in September and October in northern areas ...   >> read article

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