Nationally known plantsman Roy Diblik has been studying and growing plants for more than 30 years. Author of Roy Diblik’s Small Perennial Gardens: The Know Maintenance Approach, he is also a consultant, speaker and co-owner of Northwind Perennial Farm in Burlington.

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Golden Showers Threadleaf Coreopsis
by Roy Diblik       #Hot Plants


Yellow-blooming Golden Showers Coreopsis brightens a perennial planting bed.

If you’ve grown Coreopsis ‘Moonbeam’, C. rosea, ‘Limerock Ruby’ or C. grandiflora ‘Sunray’, you might have been disappointed. All are good plants when used within their capabilities, but none are tough, adaptable plants. For that, you need Coreopsis verticillata Golden Showers ‘Gradiflora’. This plant is durable. It’s little used because of the misfortunes of the others.

It’s a plant that’s very tolerant of soil and moisture conditions. It can survive on average rainfall and will tolerate some dry soil. I have grown this coreopsis since 1982 and have successfully planted it in many gardens. In addition to nice, golden yellow flowers from early July into September, this plant has beautiful fall foliage color. The foliage turns a very nice yellow, maturing to dark brown by mid-November.

 

 

Common Name: Golden Showers coreopsis or tickseed

Botanical Name: Coreopsis verticillata

Hardiness: USDA Zone: 4 through 9

Blooms: Daisy-like, golden yellow, 1-1   inch diameter, clustered densely at the top of the plant.

Blooming Period: Early July into September

Exposure: Full sun to light shade

Size: 12-24 inches tall and wide

When to Plant: Throughout the growing season

Soil: Average,well-drained soil (can tolerate moister soils).

Watering: Keep moist until established. Thereafter, does not need supplemental watering.

When to fertilize: Needs no commercial fertilizer. Nutrients can be provided by mulching with leaf compost every two to three years.

In Your Landscape: I like to grow it with Echinacea purpurea ‘Rubinglow’ in a 30/70 split, or with Panicum virgatum ‘Heavy Metal’ in a 40/60 pairing.

From Wisconsin Gardening Volume II Issue IV. Photo courtesy of Roy Diblik.

 

Posted: 08/08/14   RSS | Print

 

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