Green Up Winter Days with Grass
Brighten the short wintry days by growing grass indoors.
by Cindy Shapton

Brighten the short wintry days by growing some grass indoors. It’s an instant lift to run your hand over a pot of green, lush turf while dreaming of warmer days and grass beneath your feet.

Although you can grow most any type of typical lawn grass seed you may have sitting around in the garage, why not grow a grass that is good for you too?   >> read article
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Persian shield
A stunning foliage plant from the Victorian era.
by Phillip Oliver

Persian shield is a stunning foliage plant that once you grow it, you’ll want it in your garden every year. Native to Burma (Myanmar), it was a popular plant during the Victorian era and is regaining popularity after the University of Georgia reintroduced it a few years ago. This plant loves heat and humidity and doesn’t start growing well until days start to get warmer.   >> read article
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Gear Up for Cold Weather Gardening
by Melissa Burdick

It’s hard to keep an avid gardener cooped up inside all winter. The gardener starts to go stir crazy and, in turn, drives all those around her – those who are perfectly content to remain cozied up on the couch, mind you – just as crazy. But on the coldest winter days it can be just as difficult for the gardener to put on enough layers to keep out the chill without morphing into an awkward creature that ambles through the garden like the unfortunate love child of Sasquatch and a penguin.   >> read article
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Trees for Winter Interest
It’s all about the bark and berries.
by Jim Weeks

Bark is beautiful. Berries are also beautiful. So says Dr. Leonard O. Miller, who suggests selecting and planting items for winter interest. Dr. Miller is the developer of Lendonwood Gardens in Grove, Okla., and donated the property to a nonprofit corporation in January 1997. Lendonwood Gardens is at its peak in the spring and summer.   >> read article
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Cardoon
A plant that really shines in the winter. Try one today!
by Andy Cabe

The cardoon is a fabulous plant that can provide plenty of interest in your garden. Cardoons form a rosette of deeply lobed, nearly 3-foot long silvery leaves. Mature specimens can reach upwards of 5 feet tall, so it is easy to see how this plant can make an impact. While the cardoon is truly an evergreen perennial for us in the piedmont of South Carolina, it really shines during the winter. We typically use cardoon at Riverbanks as a winter-interest plant, often using it as an annual to give some size and texture to winter bedding schemes.   >> read article
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Edible Chrysanthemum
They're yellow and they're tasty. Try the Chrysanthemum
by Mengmeng Gu

Every family in the Gu's village where I spent my childhood had a row of edible chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum nankingense) along the north side of their house and very close to the wall. Starting in early summer we pick the tender tips, about 1 inch long, and use them in stir-fry or soup. It has a very refreshing taste. This continues until early or midfall, depending on whether we want flowers. Picking encourages more growing tips (and flowers later on) and keeps the plant short and rounded. It flowers in late fall if picking stops around early fall. In late fall, tons of tiny, 1/2 inch golden yellow flowers cover and fill the plant. [Edible chrysanthemum brings sunshine to the landscape in late fall.] Edible chrysanthemum is the most shade-tolerant and pruning-tolerant chrysanthemum that I have ever seen. It not only flowers on the outside, but also the inside of the plant canopy, probably because of its shade tolerance.   >> read article
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Annuals to the Rescue
Fill out your yard with color. Try our featured annuals.
by Norman Winter

You've just been notified of a cancellation on the home and garden tour and your garden has been chosen as a replacement. To add to the excitement, you have a little over a month to get it into full bloom. Don't panic: It's Annuals to the Rescue!   >> read article
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Creating the Woodland Garden
Selecting plants is tough. Let us help you find the one.
by Peter Gallagher

When making decisions about any specific landscape situation, we must consider issues like design, style, plant preferences, sun or shade tolerance, topography, soil type, and moisture conditions. In some cases, the situation may suggest a number of possible alternatives. But occasionally, the site lends itself to an ideal single solution. Such is the case with a tree-covered area that either sits on the property line or surrounds the home. By implementing a natural design that accentuates the existing landscape, this forest-like setting can be transformed into a woodland garden.   >> read article
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