Veggies Front & Center
by Kate Copsey

Many gardeners would like to grow fruits and vegetables but do not have a sunny backyard. Why not use the sunny front yard? It is possible to raise edibles in the front garden and still keep your curb appeal.
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Seamless Stream
A Natural-Looking Water Feature For Your Landscape
by Barb and Gary Rudolf

Water features are a hot topic in gardening. Even mainstream publications are touting them. However, most of the publicity blitz focuses on ponds, fountains and water gardens in containers. If you are interested in exploring water gardening, have you considered a cascading stream?   >> read article
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Your First Herb Garden
by Jim Long

According to the National Garden Bureau 2010 saw more first-time gardeners than any time in recent history. Statistics reveal many of these first-time gardeners began with vegetables and plan to add herbs in the coming year. I’ve been growing herbs since childhood, and to me vegetables are interesting, but adding herbs makes them exciting. Tomatoes, for example, are wonderful fresh, but when cooked, they just cry out for some basil, garlic and oregano. Herbs add flavor and pizzazz to vegetables, fish, poultry, even cheese or egg dishes. Herbs are also incredibly easy to grow provided you follow a few basics.   >> read article
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Garden Hotties
Herbs that can take the heat
by Maria Griener

’Tis the season of the “Twin 95s.” Ninety-five degrees and 95 percent humidity, that is. As a result, the parsley has gone to seed in most gardens. So has the dill. The nasturtium flowers have withered away. But fear not. The hotties are here to stay, bringing forth blooms and new growth despite the Deep South’s mantle of full sun.   >> read article
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Making a Comeback
Self Seeding Annuals and Biennials
by Krista Kugler-Quinn

I will never forget the year I planted my front flowerbed near the road. To my delight, I literally had cars stopping in front of my house and strangers coming by to ask about my beautiful garden. Of course, it was not the switch grass and daylilies that everyone was so enamored with. My showstopping combination was a haphazard mix of blue larkspur and red poppies. A friend gave me the seeds and I literally threw them over the garden in mid-November, thinking they might help add a little color while the perennials were filling out.   >> read article
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Growing Tropical Fruit in the Midwest
by Tammy Weiss

With the cold winter behind and the warm, humid summer just about here, I begin to dream of the tropics, and with that, the full-flavored, juicy fruit whose sweet fragrances fill outdoor markets and lone fruit stands on the side roads. Sadly though, with the economy not cooperating and the present fashion to have stay-cations, I have decided I could and would have both. Thus began my search for the ever-elusive tropical fruits that I could grow in my Kentucky backyard garden.   >> read article
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Outdoor Benches
by State-by-State Gardening

Placing a bench in the garden is not a simple matter of carrying it from the delivery truck to the patio. To really incorporate it into the overall garden landscape, there are a few basic considerations.

First, you should determine whether or not you really intend to sit on the bench. Are you showcasing it for garden tours, or do you want the bench to serve as your own private retreat? Do you see it as place to exhibit containers, or a spot to write a letter to a friend? Answering these questions will help you determine appropriate size, design and materials.   >> read article
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No Fuss…No Till
by Beth Botts

A growing number of experts say annual tilling is unnecessary—maybe even harmful. Here’s why. Garden wisdom has long held that preparing a vegetable garden means yearly tilling: digging to mix up the top 6 or 8 inches of soil and incorporate new organic matter such as compost to increase its fertility.   >> read article
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