Sitting in the Garden
by Denise Schreiber

Our lives are so hectic anymore, working late, attending functions, running children to softball, hockey, dance and wherever they need to be that we have forgotten some of the simple pleasures of life that make us happy.   >> read article
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Cover Crops in the Vegetable Garden
by Jack Horan

If you have harvested everything from your vegetable garden and decided not to plant cool-season crops, then now is the time to start a cover crop, which just means planting something to cover up the dirt. Big-time farmers plant cover crops such as clover and rye, and backyard gardeners can reap the same benefits for their dormant gardens during the winter months with a cover crop.   >> read article
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Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick
Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’
by Mike Klahr, Ph.D.

Are you interested in the unusual, or even the bizarre? If so, your curiosity (and that of your neighbors) might be piqued by the uniqueness of the contorted European filbert, a plant fondly known as Harry Lauder’s walking stick ...   >> read article
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Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’
Lagerstroemia (indica x fauriei) ‘Pocomoke’
by Charlotte Kidd

Do you enjoy the late-season flowers of crapemyrtle but don’t have space for a tree? Allow me to introduce you to ‘Pocomoke’—a handsome, dwarf crapemyrtle. It’s not quite knee-high—a densely branched mound of deep rosy-raspberry flowers floating above forest-green leaves.   >> read article
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The Gall of it All
by Douglas A. Spilker, Ph.D.

Galls are the enlargement of plant tissue caused by injury or irritation by parasitic organisms such as insects, mites, nematodes, fungi and bacteria. They are also interesting looking — knotty, lumpy and sometimes colorful. Learn which ones are common in your garden.   >> read article
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Barking Up the Right Tree
by Joyce Mendenhall

Bark may not be the first thing that comes to mind when choosing a tree. Even those of us who are quick to celebrate the practical significance that trees play in our lives often neglect to consider the simple beauty of their bark.   >> read article
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Eastern Baccharis
Baccharis halimifolia
by Barrett Wilson

Most gardeners probably don’t consider using our native Eastern baccharis in a home landscape. Often seen on roadsides and clearings, this low-maintenance shrub can make a striking impression on the early to mid-autumn landscape.   >> read article
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Chrysanthemum ‘Cathy’s Rust’
by Andy Cabe

When it comes to mums, I have a love/hate relationship. I’m not a fan of the potted varieties you buy in the fall that are perfect, round meatballs of a plant. That being said, I absolutely love the old-fashioned garden mums that have been passed along for generations.
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