Chinese Che Tree
Cudrania tricuspidata
by Beth Burrell

Grape-size red fruits catch the eye starting in late August on this uncommon but commendable fruit tree known as Chinese che. At first it is slow to grow, a few inches at best. Just be patient – as with many plants three years seems to be the charm ...   >> read article
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Common Diseases of Landscape Trees & Shrubs
by Douglas A. Spilker, Ph.D.

What’s that spot on the leaves? Or that fuzzy stuff? Why are the leaves falling off? Here’s how to tell whether your woody plants are really sick or just have a little case of fungus.   >> read article
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The Art of Subdividing
Why Landscape Design is so Very Important
by Garry Menendez

When you hear the term “subdivision,” what do you envision? Coming from someone with a bumper sticker on the back of his truck that reads “Urban Sprawl – Cut Down All the Trees and Name the Streets After Them,” I usually picture just that scene.   >> read article
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Boxelder tree
Acer negundo
by LeeAnn Barton

Acer negundo has a large native range throughout the southern and midwestern United States as well as parts of Canada. Usually found in bottomland forests and populating old homesteads. Its tolerance to extreme cold and drought has made this tree a survivor through much of the U.S. It can be used as a temporary planting, providing fast growth and shade while slower growing trees gain maturity. Wide, relatively shallow roots are perfect for erosion control.   >> read article
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Trumpet Spurflower
Rabdosia longituba
by Sue Speichert

My husband assigned to me the responsibility of watering all the plants in our home garden. This was no light task, since we always had more plants in pots than we had plants in the ground, and in the heat of summer, many of the potted plants had to be watered at least once, if not twice, every day.   >> read article
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The Self-Sufficient Gardener
Developing Transplants from Seed is Easy in a Greenhouse
by Amanda Ferguson Sears

When growing your own transplants, it is very important to control temperature, ventilation, light and moisture. Temperatures for warm-season crops should be between 65 and 80 F during the day, with nighttime temperatures of 60 to 65 F.   >> read article
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Sustainability: Right Plant, Right Place
by Maria Zampini

A sustainable garden is a plant community that takes care of itself. By using the right plants in the right place, you can have a low- or no-maintenance landscape that is also eco-friendly.   >> read article
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Sitting in the Garden
by Denise Schreiber

Our lives are so hectic anymore, working late, attending functions, running children to softball, hockey, dance and wherever they need to be that we have forgotten some of the simple pleasures of life that make us happy.   >> read article
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