The March of Garden Color: Year-Round Hues & Interest
by Gloria Day

Year-round color and interest for the garden cannot be achieved in a single visit to the garden center—you need careful planning, research and a good shopping list. Here’s how to start preparing.   >> read article
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Sky flower
Thunbergia grandiflora
by P. J. Gartin

Sky flower (Thunbergia grandiflora) packs a late summer color punch just when our gardens desperately need one. In late July or early August, just as the crapemyrtle blossoms start to fade and zinnias begin to melt away, this vine produces glorious clusters of 3-inch-wide, periwinkle-blue flowers. As if caught in a perpetual yawn, these bell-shaped blossoms show off creamy white or buttery yellow throats.   >> read article
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Roses are Our Favorites
by TC Conner

It’s been New York’s state flower since 1955, Georgia declared it as their emblematic flower in 1916, North Dakota and Iowa calls it their flower, and Ronald Reagan officially made it our national flower on November 20, 1986.   >> read article
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Rain, Rain, Don’t Go Away
by Linda Wiggen Kraft

Rainwater harvesting is one of the easiest ways gardeners can help save money and create beauty in their garden, while at the same time helping the environment.   >> read article
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Let’s Stop Pruning with “Shear” Ignorance
by Bonnie Lee Appleton

What’s one of the most obvious and common mistakes made in landscapes anywhere in the southern U.S.? Improper pruning or excessive shearing (though it’s stretching the definition of pruning) of shrubs. Nothing jumps out of a landscape faster than a once graceful, natural-form shrub that has been sheared into a mathematician’s delight – be it round, square, pyramidal or rectangular. From a horticultural standpoint, unnecessary, form-damaging shearing of shrubs is almost as criminal as the topping of trees.   >> read article
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Keeping Caladiums
Getting Them Ready for Next Year
by Allen Owings

Caladiums generally begin to decline in late September or October, and then it’s time to decide what you want to do with them. If the bed where the caladiums are planted will stay relatively undisturbed and continue to drain well, you may have luck by simply leaving the caladium tubers in the ground. Keep the area mulched this winter to protect the tubers. If your ground doesn’t freeze, they will probably survive and come back up next year and provide a beautiful display.   >> read article
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Plant Your Spring Lawn Now
by Stacey Mollus

Next May, wouldn’t you love to have the best looking-lawn in your neighborhood? If your answer is yes, you need to begin by overseeding now. It is hard to believe that putting seed down now will make that big of a difference six months from now, but it does.   >> read article
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A Hotbed of Ideas
Try These Flowerbed Ideas In Your Own Landscape
by Anita Stamper

Try These Flowerbed Ideas In Your Own Landscape   >> read article
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