Common Ninebark
by Hubert P. Conlon

You may call it common or Eastern ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius), but this native shrub has become anything but common. Ninebark has been to finishing school with several fabulous new cultivars introduced. Bright, colorful foliage – burgundy, copper, gold and variegated – have replaced the standard medium green leaves of the old-fashioned ninebark. The species has been tamed, a lot more compact and less vigorous.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

10 Commandments for Your Best Garden Ever
(and 8 Amendments)
by Gita Smith

Gardening advice is plentiful nowadays, but some advice can be contradictory or untested. For example, one website advises planting when the moon is in a water sign, such as Pisces, Scorpio or Cancer, “because rain is more likely.” Call me crazy, but I would rather plant when the weather is dry and then use my hose to water the seed or transplants. What should a gardener do ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Problem or Opportunity
by Mary Lou McFarland

Many gardeners tend to view landscaping problems first as a challenge, and then as an opportunity. The thought of transforming an uninviting eyesore into a functional and beautiful garden area causes a rush of excitement. Being able to also trade high maintenance for low maintenance puts many gardeners in a state of euphoria. Yes, gardeners tend to be “glass-half-full” kind of folks.   >> read article
Comments (1) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Watch Them Grow
Imaginations Blossom When Children Plant Gardens
by Marilyn H. Collins

True gardeners of every age find it fun to dig in the dirt, play with water, feel the texture and size of various seeds, plant them and watch them grow. Children are curious and want to know what is happening underground as well as on top.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Prime Perennials for Shady Areas
by Barbara Pleasant

A shady garden is much more than a place that is not dominated by sun. A leafy ceiling, a soft brown floor and pretty plants that come and go with the seasons make a shade garden an irresistible spot to relax and feel the cool beauty of Mother Nature as she likes things to be. After all, if we did not need open spaces for our houses and roads, the forests that once covered the South would slowly return.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Foxgloves in the Southern Garden
by Gerald Klingaman

The transition from the riot of color during spring’s awakening of the garden to the lazy days of summer is one of my favorite periods. Though the calendar tells us it is still spring, the flowers and the warmer temperatures inform us another spring will soon pass into the record books. It is during this transitional period that many old-fashioned favorite garden plants bloom. Irises, peonies, hollyhock and especially foxgloves make their presence known during this period.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Ornamental Envy
Plan for Fall Interest with Ornamental Grasses
by Norman Winter

Fall is the season when many of us envy our neighbor’s gardens. You know what I’m talking about. One morning, you step out the front door and stroll through your front yard, which is just about done showing off for the year. While you are picking up the morning paper, you see something through the corner of our eye: your neighbor’s garden is still outperforming the rest. Something is swaying in the breeze with its beautiful blooms, just daring you to ask the neighbor, “Where did you learn that trick? What design school did you attend?”   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Zen Gardens
A Place For Harmony And Balance
by Claudia C. Swanson

It seems that now, more than ever, people are trying especially hard to make their busy lives less stressful and more meaningful. Gardening can help in a subtle way that few other activities can manage, and the guiding principles of Zen gardening can lead to the creation of a truly calming, harmonious, and uplifting environment. These gardens are not designed to excite the senses in the way that Western plots do but are places for the spirit to find peace and tranquility in which to grow. Zen Buddhism requires that every task is performed with love – and it is the love and care that is put into them that gives them a serene and kindly atmosphere.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Jump to page: « First  <  91 92 93 94 95 >  Last »