Roses are Our Favorites
by TC Conner

It’s been New York’s state flower since 1955, Georgia declared it as their emblematic flower in 1916, North Dakota and Iowa calls it their flower, and Ronald Reagan officially made it our national flower on November 20, 1986.   >> read article
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Foxgloves in the Southern Garden
by Gerald Klingaman

The transition from the riot of color during spring’s awakening of the garden to the lazy days of summer is one of my favorite periods. Though the calendar tells us it is still spring, the flowers and the warmer temperatures inform us another spring will soon pass into the record books. It is during this transitional period that many old-fashioned favorite garden plants bloom. Irises, peonies, hollyhock and especially foxgloves make their presence known during this period.   >> read article
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Rescue or Theft
by Mary Lou McFarland

There is a movement among many garden enthusiasts to “rescue” the wonderful heirloom bulbs, shrubs and wildflowers of our ancestors’ time. Many areas where they grow are being bulldozed for construction of homes, businesses and highways, while other areas are getting so overgrown with trees, vines and weeds, the plants are unable to survive without the necessary sunlight. Although saving these bulbs for future generations is a noble activity, it does not give us the right to take something that does not belong to us. Let us be clear about this fact. All land belongs to someone.   >> read article
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Fragrant Gardens
Captured by the Spell of the Smell
by Norman Winter

I was walking on a Caribbean beach one evening heading toward a favorite spot for jerked chicken when I was captured by the fragrance of a large, blooming shrub. Now if I were relegated to growing only one plant for the rest of my life, it would be that plant, the night-blooming jasmine (Cestrum nocturnum).   >> read article
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How to Plant and Care for Lavender in the Southeast
by Annie Greer Baggett

Lavender is one of the most popular fragrances in the world, and many people long to enjoy it in the garden. Whether along a sidewalk, by a mailbox or in a sunny garden, you can learn how to properly plant it for years of enjoyment. Lavender is very drought tolerant once established, and spring is a perfect time to plant this lovely and oh-so-fragrant herb. There are hundreds of varieties of lavender that grow throughout the world. There are a proven dozen that grow well in the piedmont of North Carolina where our farm is situated, and we're still trying to find more.   >> read article
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Creating Successful Hanging Baskets
A great return for a little investment
by Stephanie Hudak

Bright, colorful hanging baskets are like exclamation points in your garden story. They can draw your attention to other areas in the landscape; connect the garden to the house; or add a bright spot to an otherwise dark area of the porch or patio. As yards get smaller and gardening time is lost to busy schedules, a hanging basket may be the fastest and easiest way to bring color into your landscape. Successful three-season baskets are possible by paying attention to the core components: correct soil mix, adequate fertilizer, proper watering and good plant choices.   >> read article
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Bonfire Begonias
Enliven your spring patio and landscape.
by Elena Fennell

Enliven your spring patio and landscape with Bonfire begonias. Their shocking scarlet-orange blossoms easily light up canopied beds and containers as profusions of dainty bells elegantly hang from arching blue-green limbs. Perfect for hanging baskets or mixed containers, Bonfire begonias stand only 18 inches in height, as their swooping stems gracefully cascade downward, creating a remarkable fountain of fiery orange. Heat up your containers with innovative varieties like Bonfire Choc Orange or Bonfire Choc Pink to enjoy cinnamon red and cotton candy blooms, lavishly infused with rich, chocolate mocha leaves.   >> read article
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Orchids - Methods for Growing the Perfect Phalaenopsis
by Dave Holder

When beginners tell me they want to start growing orchids, the discussion usually gets around to the question, “ What is the best orchid to start with?” My answer is: “Phalaenopsis because it is so easy to grow and stays in flower a long time, and a greenhouse is not necessary for good results with this plant.”   >> read article
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