Delta Jazz Crapemyrtle
Lagerstroemia hybrid
by James Robbins, Ph.D

I feel like the FDA pulling the plug on a prescription drug trial before all the results are in, but I am atypically confident that Delta Jazz crapemyrtle is a unique hot plant for Arkansas. Our University of Arkansas Plant Evaluation program started evaluating this plant ...   >> read article
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The Fifth Season
by Kylee Baumle

To everything there is a season, it is written, and no one knows this more than gardeners. We cold-climate growers have just wrapped up the biggest one of all – summer – and have enjoyed a pretty luxurious fall. Most of us don’t really look forward to the cold and gray days of winter, but at our house, we celebrate another growing season: The Amaryllis Season.   >> read article
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Chrysanthemum ‘Cathy’s Rust’
by Andy Cabe

When it comes to mums, I have a love/hate relationship. I’m not a fan of the potted varieties you buy in the fall that are perfect, round meatballs of a plant. That being said, I absolutely love the old-fashioned garden mums that have been passed along for generations.
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The Rudiments Of Roses
Don’t Shy Away From Growing Roses!
by Lea Brit

Truly there are varieties available for even the most timid or inexperienced gardeners. All roses require some attention, but numerous types are more self sufficient, thriving for years with minimal care.   >> read article
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Roses are Our Favorites
by TC Conner

It’s been New York’s state flower since 1955, Georgia declared it as their emblematic flower in 1916, North Dakota and Iowa calls it their flower, and Ronald Reagan officially made it our national flower on November 20, 1986.   >> read article
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Foxgloves in the Southern Garden
by Gerald Klingaman

The transition from the riot of color during spring’s awakening of the garden to the lazy days of summer is one of my favorite periods. Though the calendar tells us it is still spring, the flowers and the warmer temperatures inform us another spring will soon pass into the record books. It is during this transitional period that many old-fashioned favorite garden plants bloom. Irises, peonies, hollyhock and especially foxgloves make their presence known during this period.   >> read article
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Rescue or Theft
by Mary Lou McFarland

There is a movement among many garden enthusiasts to “rescue” the wonderful heirloom bulbs, shrubs and wildflowers of our ancestors’ time. Many areas where they grow are being bulldozed for construction of homes, businesses and highways, while other areas are getting so overgrown with trees, vines and weeds, the plants are unable to survive without the necessary sunlight. Although saving these bulbs for future generations is a noble activity, it does not give us the right to take something that does not belong to us. Let us be clear about this fact. All land belongs to someone.   >> read article
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Fragrant Gardens
Captured by the Spell of the Smell
by Norman Winter

I was walking on a Caribbean beach one evening heading toward a favorite spot for jerked chicken when I was captured by the fragrance of a large, blooming shrub. Now if I were relegated to growing only one plant for the rest of my life, it would be that plant, the night-blooming jasmine (Cestrum nocturnum).   >> read article
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