Blessed Are the Aggressive
For they shall inherit the garden
by Scott Beuerlein

Ideally, good, aggressive garden plants are tough, spread nicely and can be controlled easily by pulling, cultivation or herbicides. The thicker and taller they are, the better they suppress weeds. But what exactly are ‘good’ aggressive plants?   >> read article
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A Battle with Emerald Ash Borer is in Your Future
by Jonathan Heaton

Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive beetle that has killed tens of millions of ash trees in the Midwest since first discovered in Michigan in 2002. If you haven’t already dealt with this serious problem, you, your neighborhood and community will face it in the not-too-distant future ...   >> read article
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Prevent Mint From Taking Over the Garden
by Trish Joseph

Mint is remarkably easy to grow under most conditions. It thrives in moist, well-drained soil, in sun or partial shade. The drier the soil, the more shade it prefers. Mint is incredibly vigorous and drought resistant. It can die back after blooming in the hot dry summer and reappear lush and thriving in the fall ...   >> read article
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Invasives in the Trade
The threat in your own yard
by Melissa Burdick

Plant exploration has been an alluring and exciting facet of the horticultural world for millennia. Centuries ago, exotic plants moved along the Silk Road between Europe and Asia. During the age of sailing, individuals paid a king’s ransom for rare specimens for their glass houses and royal estates. During the Victorian era, the up-and-coming ...   >> read article
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Invasive Invaders
by Pamela J. Bennett

Many species of non-native invasive plants, insects and animals plague the Midwest. Why should gardeners care? Here is what you need to know. Chestnut blight in the early 1900s. Dutch elm disease in the mid-1900s. Emerald ash borer in the early 2000s. Asian longhorned beetle has been discovered in five states with the most recent find in Ohio. The list of invasive species goes on and grows ...   >> read article
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Southern Stayers
Five Species that Have Overstayed Their Welcome
by Stephen Bishop

With mild winters, beautiful beaches, majestic mountains and friendly people, who would turn down the chance to visit the South? Unfortunately, some botanical visitors have overstayed their welcome and set down roots. For the following species, things that started off as a garden trial have turned into a forest invasion.   >> read article
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