‘Black Velvet’ Petunia
Petunia x hybrid ‘Black Velvet’
by Alice Longfellow

‘Black Velvet’ is the latest petunia to hit garden centers and is sure to be a big hit among gardening enthusiasts this spring. This unique black petunia has great potential in the landscape as it looks spectacular mixed with white, yellow and pink colors. Use other colors of petunias or accent ‘Black Velvet’ with delicate flowers like gaura, ‘Snow Princess’ lobularia or euphorbia.   >> read article
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Japanese apricot ‘Peggy Clarke’
Prunus mume
by Alan Pulley

There’s not much out in the garden that can beat the winter blues like Prunus mume ’Peggy Clarke’, also known as the Japanese flowering apricot tree. When it’s too cold for much else to bloom, this small tree bravely sends out its blossoms on bare limbs in mid to late winter, providing the kind of showy display that most plants set aside for spring. It’s an amazing sight in the dead of winter.   >> read article
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Helleborus ‘Walhelivor’ Ivory Prince
by Chris Nejelski

A new Plant of Merit Introduction for 2011 — and one of the earliest bloomers for spring (I’ve personally seen blooms the end of February). Helleborus ‘Walhelivor’ is commonly sold in commerce by the trade name of Ivory Prince. It was selected in 1995 in Sussex, England, from a controlled breeding program designed to produce new Helleborus sp. plants that exhibited ...   >> read article
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Whitewater Red Bud
Cercis canadensis
by Clara A. Curtis

Cercis canadensis ‘Whitewater’ is a “hot plant” out of North Carolina and a North American native tree too! This small, deciduous tree with beautifully variegated white and green leaves was developed by Dr. Dennis Werner at North Carolina State University. It’s a good choice to incorporate into your garden where contrasting foliage color is desired. Traditional magenta-pink flowers of the redbud emerge in the early spring on bare branches ...   >> read article
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‘Green Giant’ Arborvitae
Thuja standishii x plicata
by Kristopher Stone

Do you need a fast-growing evergreen screen that is resistant to deer and bagworms? Or perhaps you are looking for a great focal point evergreen as a specimen or in a grouping? If so, look no further than ‘Green Giant’ arborvitae (Thuja standishii x plicata ‘Green Giant’).   >> read article
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Chartreuse Houseplants
by Chris Baker

The hot plant for January isn’t a plant at all. It’s a color — chartreuse. Chartreuse goes with just about every other color and never fails to brighten up a dark room on a dreary winter day. Fortunately, there are a number of excellent new houseplants that shine brightly in chartreuse.   >> read article
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Sweet Alyssum Wonderland Series
Lobularia maritima
by Clara A. Curtis

Sweet alyssum, as the name hints, is certainly a sweet-smelling annual, but it’s often grown in such small quantities that the smell is overlooked. Butterflies are drawn to the fragrant small flowers that range in color from blue to lavender, pink, yellow and white.
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Purpletop Vervain
Verbena bonariensis
by Lynda Heavrin

I will never run out of plants to discuss as I love so many, but I asked my friends what they will be thinking about in January/February and in unison I heard “seeds.” So, an easy plant from seed it is — one of my favorites is Verbena bonariensis.
  >> read article
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