Henderson’s Daphne
Daphne x hendersonii
by Joseph Tychonievich

See Daphne x hendersonii in the garden and first, you fall in love with the dense, gorgeous, glossy, dark, evergreen foliage. Already in love with the leaves, you’ll faint when spring comes and the shrub covers itself with lush clusters of rich pink flowers. Bend down for a closer look and catch a whiff of that incredible fragrance and you’re a goner. Even better? Come late summer it blooms again, just as profusely and fragrantly ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Topiary Gardens
by Denise Schreiber

Ultimately, gardening is the act of ‘controlling’ plants and shaping the landscape to our own designs. Topiary takes ‘gardening’ to a higher level. Topiary, the art of training live plants to grow into a myriad of shapes and forms by clipping foliage and branches has been practiced since Roman times. The word itself comes from the word topiarius, a description of an ornamental landscape gardener or the creator of topia ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick
Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’
by Mike Klahr, Ph.D.

Are you interested in the unusual, or even the bizarre? If so, your curiosity (and that of your neighbors) might be piqued by the uniqueness of the contorted European filbert, a plant fondly known as Harry Lauder’s walking stick ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Common Ninebark
by Hubert P. Conlon

You may call it common or Eastern ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius), but this native shrub has become anything but common. Ninebark has been to finishing school with several fabulous new cultivars introduced. Bright, colorful foliage – burgundy, copper, gold and variegated – have replaced the standard medium green leaves of the old-fashioned ninebark. The species has been tamed, a lot more compact and less vigorous.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Made in the Shade
Indicator Plants And Shade Gardening
by Gerald Klingaman

Shade is a major design consideration in most gardens in the Southern U.S. Given the opportunity, we nestle our homes under the spreading boughs of forest giants and are forced from the outset to develop a garden that will never know the full intensity of the sun. Or, if our subdivision was a cotton field or cow pasture in a previous life, we grow our own shade – never quite believing that those small switches we plant will one day become sylvan giants and rob sunlight like a thief in the night. Shade is a good thing, though. It makes our outdoor living spaces habitable during the muggy months and permits the summer-long enjoyment of our gardens.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Bringing Home the Birds
Keep your feathered friends flocking to your yard
by Shannon Pable

Soon, the palette of the landscape will be transforming from subtle browns and tans and exploding into splashes of hot pink, white, yellow and purple. The sweet-smelling crabapple blossoms will shower papery petals in a gentle breeze, blanketing the landscape. The rustling chatter and singing of wildlife will fill the once still air. Soon, spring will be here!   >> read article
Comments (1) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Jump to page:  <  1 2