Have Shovel, Will Travel
by Jen Nathan Orris

When Ralph Coffey decided to move his garden from Lake Norman to Asheville, N.C., he knew the 100-mile journey was a risk. He spent years cultivating his collection of unusual plants and he couldn’t imagine leaving them behind.   >> read article
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The Tall and Skinny
Gardening with columnar and fastigiate evergreens
by Les Parks

It is no secret that plants come in many shapes, sizes, and growth habits. For those of us who are fortunate enough to know the joys of gardening, we get to take advantage of this great variety when creating our own personal Eden. Two nearly identical groups of plants that are both fun to work with and practical, are columnar and fastigiate evergreens.   >> read article
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Bald Cypress
Taxodium distichum
by Peter Gallagher

Learn about the Bald Cypress in this plant profile video.   >> read article
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Little Gem Magnolia
Magnolia grandiflora
by Peter Gallagher

Little Gem Magnolia, a cultivar of Magnolia grandiflora, is a great option for those more restricted spaces or smaller landscapes, where the traditional Southern Magnolia would be far too large. This cultivar normally reaches a height of only 15 to 20 feet with a spread of 10 to 15 feet. As such, this can fit quite nicely somewhat closer to the home or as part of a border planting along a fence or property line.   >> read article
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Myrtle Mania
So many new crapemyrtle varieties to choose from
by Allen Owings

New varieties of crapemyrtles (Lagerstroemia spp.) are currently available in abundance. We could almost say, “Enough is enough.” Yes, it is overwhelming with the numbers of new crapemyrtle varieties. Developers are introducing plants with the goals of smaller growth habits, dark foliage (such as burgundy and black), earlier blooms, and darker flowers (better red, purples, etc.). In one recent evaluation, new crapemyrtles went from fewer than 20 varieties to over 50 varieties in a very short period of time.   >> read article
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Three Great Fruit Trees for the Midwest Garden
by Patti Marie Travioli

As a kid, I didn’t care as much about the holiday meal as much as I looked forward to enjoying the homemade jams and freshly baked desserts. As an adult, I try to create something new for the holiday meal, while still including some traditional recipes.   >> read article
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Plant the Right Tree the Right Way for Long-Lasting Beauty
by Jonathan Heaton

Spring is here and you may be getting ready to plant a new tree. As the saying goes: The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, the next best time is now. Trees are a long-term investment. They take a long time to establish and provide benefits we enjoy. Proper planting practices will help get your trees off to a good start, enhancing your landscape for years to come ...   >> read article
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‘Ruby Falls’ Redbud
Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’
by Bob Hill

Gardeners hungry for great plants in small spaces will quickly welcome the ‘Ruby Falls’ weeping redbud (Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’) into their landscapes.

‘Ruby Falls’, bred at North Carolina State University from other purple-leafed redbuds ‘Covey’ and ‘Forest Pansy’, has the strong pink flowers of its parents – and their deep purple to shiny burgundy leaves that fade to green.   >> read article
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