Some Enchanted Evening
by Troy B. Marden

After a long day at work, nothing is more relaxing to me than an evening stroll through the garden. The colors are more saturated in the sunset light than any other time of day, and after dark, the garden takes on a life of its own. In an attempt to attract nighttime pollinators, flowers often unleash intoxicating fragrances that permeate the damp, evening air. Some even open in time-lapse fashion, and I find myself mesmerized watching their petals unfurl. Many of these plants are easy to find and to grow, which makes them all the more appealing. If I had to narrow the list down to just a few of my top favorites that make my garden come to life every night, the list might look something like this   >> read article
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Making a Moon-Moth Garden
by Dr. Charles Allen

Many people enjoy their gardens during the daylight hours and head indoors as the sun starts to set. But if you install a moon-moth garden, you’ll find yourself anticipating the approach of late afternoon and early evening when you’ll be able to watch the flowers open followed by the night insect visitors (mostly moths).   >> read article
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Nighttime and Evening Gardens
by Alan Branhagen

Many of us work all day and by the time we get home to garden or relax in the garden, dusk is upon us. In the evening, the bright colors of the day recede and disappear and the creams, silvers and whites begin to glow with the fading light. We need some time to de-stress, relax and unwind from the day and we’re usually not in the mood for some energizing red colors anyway! A garden designed for evening and the night is the perfect match for many of us.   >> read article
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10 Power Performers in the Perennial Garden
by Kylee Baumle

To every flower there is a season. As winter breathes its last breath, the spring bulbs put on a show of color that gardeners and non-gardeners alike welcome as much as the warmer temperatures. The bright yellows, purples and reds of daffodils, tulips and other ephemerals carry us into early summer, when a whole new wave of color greets us ...   >> read article
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Primula for the Midwest: Five Easy Favorites
by Gene E. Bush

Primrose, cowslip, oxslip — no matter what you call them, these old-fashioned favorites are easy-to-grow early spring bloomers. Here a few to consider for your own shady garden.   >> read article
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Alliums for All
by Alan Branhagen

Alliums or ‘ornamental onions’ come in all sizes and colors—from giant globe-shaped purple spheres to delicate yellow sprays. The best part is that deer, squirrels, voles and rabbits find them foul-tasting. Here are some awe-inspiring alliums to add to your garden this year.   >> read article
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The Hottest Plants of 2012
by Maria Zampini

If you’re passionate about cars, you attend the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, where you “See the cars today that the rest of the world will be talking about tomorrow.” To view upcoming trends in the clothing by American fashion designers, you make an appearance at the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week at Bryant Park in New York City. One of the best places to discover new plants is the New Varieties Showcase at the Farwest Show in Portland ...   >> read article
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A Different Kind of Snow
by Maria Zampini

The Snow Fountains weeping cherry tree stands out in the ornamental crowd as it offers four seasons of beauty for year-round appeal. It also can be clipped, pruned, shaped, staked, bent and otherwise manipulated into a dozen or more forms. This is one small chameleon tree that you might not recognize from afar, but you will admire and desire it.   >> read article
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