Chinese Che Tree
Cudrania tricuspidata
by Beth Burrell

Grape-size red fruits catch the eye starting in late August on this uncommon but commendable fruit tree known as Chinese che. At first it is slow to grow, a few inches at best. Just be patient – as with many plants three years seems to be the charm ...   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Top Five Mistakes in the Vegetable Garden
by Bob Westerfield

It's hard to beat the fresh taste of homegrown vegetables on your dinner table, and the satisfaction of knowing you produced them yourself. While a successful vegetable garden is within reach of anyone, avoiding a few common pitfalls will help to ensure a bountiful harvest. The following lists are some common mistakes I often see that stump even the seasoned gardener on occasion.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Pink Velvet Banana
by Stephanie Hudak

The cinnamon scent, exotic leaves and exceptional fruit color of Musa velutina (pink velvet banana or hairy banana) will add a tropical flair to any garden and are hard to resist once you have seen them. With adequate winter mulch, its cold hardiness makes it possible to be grown outside tropical zones.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Plant The Yard For Beauty and Food
by Nan K. Chase

Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of shady overhanging trees can keep these five fantastic edible landscape plants from becoming standards in the Southeastern garden: crabapple, yucca, sunflower, native rose and pawpaw.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Cardoon
A plant that really shines in the winter. Try one today!
by Andy Cabe

The cardoon is a fabulous plant that can provide plenty of interest in your garden. Cardoons form a rosette of deeply lobed, nearly 3-foot long silvery leaves. Mature specimens can reach upwards of 5 feet tall, so it is easy to see how this plant can make an impact. While the cardoon is truly an evergreen perennial for us in the piedmont of South Carolina, it really shines during the winter. We typically use cardoon at Riverbanks as a winter-interest plant, often using it as an annual to give some size and texture to winter bedding schemes.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Edible Chrysanthemum
They're yellow and they're tasty. Try the Chrysanthemum
by Mengmeng Gu

Every family in the Gu's village where I spent my childhood had a row of edible chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum nankingense) along the north side of their house and very close to the wall. Starting in early summer we pick the tender tips, about 1 inch long, and use them in stir-fry or soup. It has a very refreshing taste. This continues until early or midfall, depending on whether we want flowers. Picking encourages more growing tips (and flowers later on) and keeps the plant short and rounded. It flowers in late fall if picking stops around early fall. In late fall, tons of tiny, 1/2 inch golden yellow flowers cover and fill the plant. [Edible chrysanthemum brings sunshine to the landscape in late fall.] Edible chrysanthemum is the most shade-tolerant and pruning-tolerant chrysanthemum that I have ever seen. It not only flowers on the outside, but also the inside of the plant canopy, probably because of its shade tolerance.   >> read article
Comments (0) | Leave a Comment | RSS | Print | Share on Facebook | Share on Twitter

Jump to page: « First  <  3 4 5