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The newest featured hotplant was written by:

Yvonne L. Bordelon

Yvonne Lelong Bordelon is a nature photographer, Master Gardener and former president of the Folsom Native Plant Society. The retired teacher-librarian has written numerous articles about plants and wildlife, some of which can be found at hubpages.com/@naturegirl7s.

 

 

Wild Quinine
by Roy Diblik - posted 08/15/14

This underused plant has everything going for it: flowers through most of the summer; an upright, beautiful habit; and tremendous fall and winter interest. Wild quinine grows 36-40 inches tall with a spread of 18-24 inches. This architectural plant mixes well with grasses. In summer, the white, flat, mounded clusters of flowers look like summer clouds floating through the garden ...   >> read article
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Hairy Wood Mint
Blephilia hirsuta
by Thomas G. Barnes - posted 07/05/13

Hairy wood mint (Blephilia hirsuta) is a wonderful native plant that can be grown in a rock garden or in light dappled shade at the edge of the woodland garden. Like most mints, it is fragrant, and the small, tubular flowers are dotted with purple at the edge of the lip. It has unusually hairy stems, opposite leaves and whorls of small flowers ...   >> read article
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Japanese Stewartia
Stewartia pseudocamellia
by Mike Klahr, Ph.D. - posted 06/28/13

Are you looking for a pest-free, small- to medium-sized landscape tree with multi-season beauty? Would you like to have a variety that does not show up on every list of The 25 Most Common Trees? Does the idea of showy summer flowers on a tree appeal to you? If so, you may want to consider planting a Japanese stewartia (Stewartia pseudocamellia) ...   >> read article
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Mamou
Erythrina herbacea
by Peter Gallagher - posted 12/09/11

Erythrina herbacea is best known in Louisiana as mamou, but it also answers to coral bean, Cherokee bean and cardinal spear. A member of the Fabaceae (bean) family, mamou has compound (trifoliate) leaves, thorny stems and showy red flowers on tall spikes in late spring to early summer, followed by long slender pods opening to reveal bright crimson-red seeds.   >> read article
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Joe-Pye Weed
by Daniel Keeley - posted 10/28/11

Joe-Pye weed is one of my favorite perennials, even if the name is somewhat unfortunate and confusing! First of all, Joe-Pye weed is not a weed at all but rather a North American native perennial.   >> read article
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