SUBSCRIBE & GET YOUR FREE 10% OFF DISCOUNT CARD
Subscribe Now
Give a Gift
Preview the magazine before you buy.
Read a FREE issue online!
Virginia Gardener Cover

Subscribe Today!
1-888-265-3600

 

  Sign up for our free gardening E-newsletter 
Give us your email address* and we'll provide monthly gardening tips and how-to's, great landscape ideas and plants to try — Delivered right to your inbox!
Your Email:
* Your email address will not be sold or shared with any third parties.

 

Calendar of Events
See our calendar for local events.

 

 

Get Involved
Participate in online discussions with an SBS user account.

Register Now  or  Log in

Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Wildlife-Friendly Gardening
Helping Little Creatures So They Can Return the Favor

Ask any gardener what their definition is of a garden and you will get a different answer each time. For most of us, it’s a place of beauty, a place of serenity, somewhere to let out our frustrations, get some exercise or all of the above.

>> read “Wildlife-Friendly Gardening”    
Edible Chrysanthemum
They're yellow and they're tasty. Try the Chrysanthemum

Every family in the Gu's village where I spent my childhood had a row of edible chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum nankingense) along the north side of their house and very close to the wall. Starting in early summer we pick the tender tips, about 1 inch long, and use them in stir-fry or soup. It has a very refreshing taste. This continues until early or midfall, depending on whether we want flowers. Picking encourages more growing tips (and flowers later on) and keeps the plant short and rounded. It flowers in late fall if picking stops around early fall. In late fall, tons of tiny, 1/2 inch golden yellow flowers cover and fill the plant. [Edible chrysanthemum brings sunshine to the landscape in late fall.] Edible chrysanthemum is the most shade-tolerant and pruning-tolerant chrysanthemum that I have ever seen. It not only flowers on the outside, but also the inside of the plant canopy, probably because of its shade tolerance.

>> read “Edible Chrysanthemum”       #Hot Plants
Creating the Woodland Garden
Selecting plants is tough. Let us help you find the one.

When making decisions about any specific landscape situation, we must consider issues like design, style, plant preferences, sun or shade tolerance, topography, soil type, and moisture conditions. In some cases, the situation may suggest a number of possible alternatives. But occasionally, the site lends itself to an ideal single solution. Such is the case with a tree-covered area that either sits on the property line or surrounds the home. By implementing a natural design that accentuates the existing landscape, this forest-like setting can be transformed into a woodland garden.

>> read “Creating the Woodland Garden”    
Trees for Winter Interest
It’s all about the bark and berries.

Bark is beautiful. Berries are also beautiful. So says Dr. Leonard O. Miller, who suggests selecting and planting items for winter interest. Dr. Miller is the developer of Lendonwood Gardens in Grove, Okla., and donated the property to a nonprofit corporation in January 1997. Lendonwood Gardens is at its peak in the spring and summer.

>> read “Trees for Winter Interest”    
Annuals to the Rescue
Fill out your yard with color. Try our featured annuals.

You've just been notified of a cancellation on the home and garden tour and your garden has been chosen as a replacement. To add to the excitement, you have a little over a month to get it into full bloom. Don't panic: It's Annuals to the Rescue!

>> read “Annuals to the Rescue”    
Going Above Ground
Two Solutions For Amendment-Weary Gardeners

It’s trite but true: You never appreciate what you have until it’s gone. When I lived in Illinois I took soil for granted. With 12 feet or more of black dirt, if you wanted a garden all you did was bury a seed, add some water and step back before the plant hit you in the nose.

>> read “Going Above Ground”    
Southern Stayers
Five Species that Have Overstayed Their Welcome

With mild winters, beautiful beaches, majestic mountains and friendly people, who would turn down the chance to visit the South? Unfortunately, some botanical visitors have overstayed their welcome and set down roots. For the following species, things that started off as a garden trial have turned into a forest invasion.

>> read “Southern Stayers”    
Vertical Gardening

A garden was not intended to be a flat space and certainly the right proportions of plants offering dimension, color, texture and unique forms are the mainstay of any landscape. Home gardeners sometimes neglect to make use of the space created by vertical areas in their yards. Vertical dimension creates new vistas and views, giving the landscape a three dimensional elegance ...

>> read “Vertical Gardening”    
Making a Comeback
Self Seeding Annuals and Biennials

I will never forget the year I planted my front flowerbed near the road. To my delight, I literally had cars stopping in front of my house and strangers coming by to ask about my beautiful garden. Of course, it was not the switch grass and daylilies that everyone was so enamored with. My showstopping combination was a haphazard mix of blue larkspur and red poppies. A friend gave me the seeds and I literally threw them over the garden in mid-November, thinking they might help add a little color while the perennials were filling out.

>> read “Making a Comeback”    
Selection of Equipment for the Vegetable Garden

There is nothing I like better than discussing, testing and using garden equipment. I am fortunate enough in my position at the University to operate a trial garden in which I test and trial, not only a variety of vegetables, but equipment as well.

>> read “Selection of Equipment for the Vegetable Garden”    
How to Make a Bentwood Fence
Add charm to gardens of any size

A bentwood fence adds charm to gardens of any size. It seems at once ancient and Old Worldly, yet vividly contemporary and in high fashion. Bentwood is best made from recycled materials – limbs pruned from trees in the yard, saplings that are out of place in the back fencerow, or even prunings left over from tree trimming after winter storms.

>> read “How to Make a Bentwood Fence”    
A Garden at Your Fingertips
Herbs are easy in pots and containers

Recently, a woman came up to me after an herb-growing presentation at a garden show. “I love cooking with herbs,” she said. “I could grow my own. But we live in an apartment with a tiny balcony and no yard.”
I hear that “no room” complaint frequently. And, while it’s somewhat understandable when it comes to growing vegetables, it’s shortsighted with herbs. Herbs lend themselves well to container growing. Indeed, they aren’t called “potherbs” for nothing ...

>> read “A Garden at Your Fingertips”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Beneficial Insects in the Garden
Learn which bugs are friends and foes

[+] Garden Joy