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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Chrysanthemum ‘Cathy’s Rust’

When it comes to mums, I have a love/hate relationship. I’m not a fan of the potted varieties you buy in the fall that are perfect, round meatballs of a plant. That being said, I absolutely love the old-fashioned garden mums that have been passed along for generations.

>> read “Chrysanthemum ‘Cathy’s Rust’”       #Hot Plants
From Jungle to Jingle
How the Poinsettia Became a Christmas Icon

As the Christmas season draws ever nearer, homes around the world take on the decorative trappings of the season. The symbolism associated with Christmas is deep, rich and ever-changing. Icons of the season – for example the Christmas tree – have been adapted from more primitive cultures. Probably neither a Druid chieftain nor Martin Luther would recognize the modern Christmas tree ...

>> read “From Jungle to Jingle”    
Herb in Autumn

What should I do with my herbs for the winter? Will they all die? Should I bring them all indoors? These are the most frequently asked questions about herb gardening this time of year. Herb gardening does not necessarily stop as soon as the basil flowers and goes to seed. Fall is a good time for cleanup in the herb garden and growing can continue indoors once the weather cools off to ...

>> read “Herb in Autumn”    
Make A Fairy Chair for Your Garden

Gardens are magical places. They’re even more magical when you invite fairy-folk to visit. With an old chair, a basket (or chicken wire) and a few flowering plants, you can make a charming focal point for your garden that fairies can’t resist ...

>> read “Make A Fairy Chair for Your Garden”    
Containers for Every Season
Ideas to inspire

Gardens are getting smaller and gardening time is getting shorter - that has been true for several years now and will probably continue to be true. But another prevailing trend is that container gardening is strong and getting stronger, not only because of time and space, but because containers offer quick satisfaction with minimal effort. You don't have to be trained in design to create stunning focal points for your garden; you just need to follow a few simple guidelines to set yourself up for success.

>> read “Containers for Every Season”    
Sunless Success: 15 Great, Easy-to-Grow Shrubs for Shade

Adding beauty and color to the shade garden can be a daunting challenge to many gardeners. Of course, there are plenty of annuals and perennials that do well, but when it comes to shrubs, or more precisely, flowering shrubs, the choices seem to dwindle. I’m going to profile 15 shrubs that do well in shade that you may want to try in your garden ...

>> read “Sunless Success: 15 Great, Easy-to-Grow Shrubs for Shade”    
A Walk in the Wild

Andrea Rubinstein moved to Louisiana from the San Francisco Bay area in 2004. Her new Lafayette home came with several mature camellias and azaleas scattered throughout the yard, a yaupon holly hedge hiding the front porch and a white rail fence along the sidewalk. “There wasn’t much more to the landscaping when I moved into the house,” says Andrea ...

>> read “A Walk in the Wild”    
Tillandsia: Plentiful and Diverse

Mention the genus Tillandsia to most gardeners, and you get a puzzled look. No, I’m not talking about the eight-legged spider (that the mere mention of its name invokes fear). I said, “Tillandsia,” not tarantula. These plants don’t bite! Even though Tillandsia, the largest genus of the bromeliad family of plants, has several species that resemble the ominous tarantula, rest assured that no harm will come to you by owning these unique plants ...

>> read “Tillandsia: Plentiful and Diverse”    
Foxgloves in the Southern Garden

The transition from the riot of color during spring’s awakening of the garden to the lazy days of summer is one of my favorite periods. Though the calendar tells us it is still spring, the flowers and the warmer temperatures inform us another spring will soon pass into the record books. It is during this transitional period that many old-fashioned favorite garden plants bloom. Irises, peonies, hollyhock and especially foxgloves make their presence known during this period.

>> read “Foxgloves in the Southern Garden”    
Weeping Plants

Some of the most spectacular landscape plants you will ever have the joy of seeing are those that have been developed with a weeping growth habit. Literally, dozens and dozens of trees, shrubs and even some perennials have been introduced through the years that display this unusual physical characteristic ...

>> read “Weeping Plants”    
Plenty of Pecans for the Holidays

California has its almonds and Florida its citrus. But from Thanksgiving through Christmas, the southern U.S. has its own legendary horticultural crop: the pecan ...

>> read “Plenty of Pecans for the Holidays”    
First Aid for Summer Squash

As we enter mid-July with August right around the corner, there are some pretty rough-looking summer squash patches that I have visited around the state in my role as a vegetable specialist. From backyard gardens to commercial growers, everyone that has grown summer squash knows the challenges that the late season can dish out ...

>> read “First Aid for Summer Squash”       #Advice   #Disease   #Pests
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Create Healthy Garden Soil
Tips to create healthy garden soil naturally.

[+] Garden Joy


Harvesting and Cooking With Dried Beans
Let some bean pods dry on the vine and save dried beans for winter soups.

[+] Bee Happy Garden