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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

10 Power Performers in the Perennial Garden

To every flower there is a season. As winter breathes its last breath, the spring bulbs put on a show of color that gardeners and non-gardeners alike welcome as much as the warmer temperatures. The bright yellows, purples and reds of daffodils, tulips and other ephemerals carry us into early summer, when a whole new wave of color greets us ...

>> read “10 Power Performers in the Perennial Garden”    
Planting By Design
Neighboring gardeners with different attitudes

Here’s my pet theory. All of us gardeners fall into one of two camps: plant lovers or design doyennes. The former waxes eloquent in Latin nomenclature, often with anthropomorphic plant references while using words such as “cultural requirements” and “fastigiated branching.” The design doyennes look for the big picture in the garden and are less concerned with individual plants ...

>> read “Planting By Design”    
What (Exactly) Is Shade?

Shade in the garden is not a malady, curse, or something less than optimal. It is an opportunity! Knowing what type of shade you are dealing with will help you select plants that will thrive.

>> read “What (Exactly) Is Shade?”    
Small Spring-Flowering Trees

This is the time of year when you notice all the blooming trees — they just seem to pop out of the landscape. Maybe it is time you added one or two (or all of them!) to your garden.

>> read “Small Spring-Flowering Trees”    
Henderson’s Daphne
Daphne x hendersonii

See Daphne x hendersonii in the garden and first, you fall in love with the dense, gorgeous, glossy, dark, evergreen foliage. Already in love with the leaves, you’ll faint when spring comes and the shrub covers itself with lush clusters of rich pink flowers. Bend down for a closer look and catch a whiff of that incredible fragrance and you’re a goner. Even better? Come late summer it blooms again, just as profusely and fragrantly ...

>> read “Henderson’s Daphne”       #Flowers   #Hot Plants   #Shrubs   #Spring   #Summer
Give Your Vegetable Garden a Makeover

Your vegetable garden can be both productive and ornamental. Here are some tips to transform your humble edible plot ...

>> read “Give Your Vegetable Garden a Makeover”    
Thousand Cankers Disease Arrives in Pennsylvania

Plant pathologists are usually not the most imaginative bunch when naming plant diseases. For instance, the rose disease caused by the fungus Diplocarpon rosae, causes a black spot on the foliage. This disease was given the name “black spot.” Another example is the fungal organism that causes a leaf spot on strawberry. In this instance, it was given the colorful name “common leaf spot.”

>> read “Thousand Cankers Disease Arrives in Pennsylvania”    
Bedtime for Roses

Not all roses need winter protection, but for those that do, here’s how to prepare them for a long winter nap.

Summer is just a memory now for gardeners as they clean and stow their tools and look forward to the holidays. But before you get sidetracked, have you thought about putting your roses to bed for the winter ...

>> read “Bedtime for Roses”    
Blessed Are the Aggressive, For They Shall Inherit the Garden

Ideally, good, aggressive garden plants are tough, spread nicely and can be controlled easily by pulling, cultivation or herbicides. The thicker and taller they are, the better they suppress weeds. But what exactly are ‘good’ aggressive plants ...

>> read “Blessed Are the Aggressive, For They Shall Inherit the Garden”    
Millstones: Symbols of Harvest in Today’s Gardens

When it comes to collecting millstones, the maxim “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” rings true. In the late 1880s, large urban mill operators started dumping these grain and corn crushers out back as a new roller technology made them obsolete and eventually put the smaller rural mills out of business. When propped alongside an old mill, the granite wheels’ interesting patterns began to attract attention for their ornamental appeal. Others were put to use as stepping stones along a path or a stoop for the back door ...

>> read “Millstones: Symbols of Harvest in Today’s Gardens”    
Elaeagnus ‘Quicksilver’

If you know Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), you probably think of it as the weedy shrub that shows up along roadsides. ‘Quicksilver’ is a hybrid relative of that weed, decked out with astonishingly intense silver foliage that is absolutely breathtaking all summer. Like its weedy relative, it is insanely tough, tolerant of cold, heat and drought, the kind of plant you never need to worry about as long as you can give it a little sun ...

>> read “Elaeagnus ‘Quicksilver’”       #Hot Plants
Planting Spring Flowering Bulbs

Daffodils, crocus, tulips, alliums and hyacinths are my top five picks for spring-flowering bulbs. A yard full of daffodils, tulips and hyacinths epitomizes the beauty of spring. So why not do yourself (and all who glance at your landscape) a favor and plant more than your fair share of these glorious spring-flowering bulbs ...

>> read “Planting Spring Flowering Bulbs”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Consider Prairie Smoke
Prairie smoke can add distinct interest

[+] Mark's Garden Ruminations


New Home for Green Beans & Peas
Adding trellises to the vegetable garden

[+] From Cheryl's Gardens


About this “Flow Hive” thing…
How you can help honeybees & pollinators

[+] Good Clean Dirt