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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

From the Mediterranean to Midwestern Gardens

Midwestern gardeners can ‘visit’ the Italian countryside by growing Umbrian plants – cyclamen of all kinds and colors, wisteria that scrambles up walls and trellises, ‘wild’ grape hyacinth and treasured tree peonies are just a few. Here’s where to start your trip ...

>> read “From the Mediterranean to Midwestern Gardens”    
Viburnum ‘Cardinal Candy’

One of the showiest viburnums for the landscape is ‘Cardinal Candy’. Its bright-red fruit creates quite a show in the fall, not to be outdone by the cream-colored flowers in spring, as well as the dark-green lustrous leaves that turn maroon and linger until November.

>> read “Viburnum ‘Cardinal Candy’”       #Hot Plants
Bloomin’ Early

March comes in like a lion and out like a lamb. And by the end of March, Midwest gardeners have had it with snow and cold. So when temperatures start to warm up and we get that whiff of spring in the air, we cheer for those perennials that first appear in late March and April. These are our harbingers of spring ...

>> read “Bloomin’ Early”    
Gardening for the Senses

Most gardens are designed to create a visual impact. However, adding plants and features that stimulate the other four senses — taste, smell, touch and hearing — will make the outdoor space so much more exciting to all visitors ...

>> read “Gardening for the Senses”    
Divine Intervention: Un-holey Containers Provide Freedom from Watering

Watering containers becomes a boring chore when the dog days of summer roll around. Who wants to be lugging hoses and watering cans when it’s blistering hot? Those containers we enjoyed planting in the spring have flourished under our good care. Roots have swelled to fill the pots and foliage and flowers spill over the edges. Sure, they look pretty, but those big root systems and extensive foliage and flowers now require water — lots of water ...

>> read “Divine Intervention: Un-holey Containers Provide Freedom from Watering”    
Aloes

When you think of aloe, you probably think of Aloe vera, the burn plant, but with the explosion in popularity of succulents in the last several years, many new hybrids, as well as lesser-known species, are now available to plant lovers. These tough plants will enjoy a sunny spot on your summer patio and do equally as well in a sunny window ...

>> read “Aloes”       #Hot Plants
Thought for Food: Planning Perfect Produce

Winter in Iowa is tailor-made for solving problems in the vegetable garden – before they begin. Our long cold nights are perfect for curling up in your favorite chair with garden books, magazines and the new crop of seed catalogs. Start by choosing troublefree varieties ...

>> read “Thought for Food: Planning Perfect Produce”       #Advice   #Edibles
Northern Crapemyrtle
The Summer Show Can Extend Well Beyond the South

As I skimmed through some of the State-by-State Gardening Midwest magazines, it occurred to me that readers in Northern states, for example in Zones 6 and 5 and in even especially warm spots in Zone 4, can, if done properly, grow crepemyrtle (Lagerstroemia indica). I have a test plot in Ft. Atkinson, Wis., and have had crapemyrtle surviving, growing and flowering the last three years. The first year the plants grew ...

>> read “Northern Crapemyrtle”    
Flowers that bridge the gap between summer and fall

August is a tough month in many gardens. The blooms of June and July are fading and the asters and mums, traditionally associated with autumn, are not yet flowering. Depending on the year, August can be hot and dry and even the hardiest blooms can appear to be faded, like an old house dress hung out week after week to dry in the sun.

>> read “Flowers that bridge the gap between summer and fall”    
Max Bloom
Tips to Extend the Bloom of 15 Favorite Garden Flowers

Continuous bloom is always a hot topic among gardeners. Here are several ideas and techniques that can help you extend the bloom time of your beloved plants.

>> read “Max Bloom”    
Sustainability: Right Plant, Right Place

A sustainable garden is a plant community that takes care of itself. By using the right plants in the right place, you can have a low- or no-maintenance landscape that is also eco-friendly.

>> read “Sustainability: Right Plant, Right Place”    
Ivy Leaved Cyclamen
Cyclamen hederifolium

Cyclamen hederifolium’s growth is the exact opposite of everything else in your garden. It wakes up and blooms in the fall, then the leaves come up and look amazing until next summer ...

>> read “Ivy Leaved Cyclamen”       #Hot Plants
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Fragrant Abelia For Spring Scent!
Fragrant Abelia perfumes the spring air

[+] Mark's Garden Ruminations


New Home for Green Beans & Peas
Adding trellises to the vegetable garden

[+] From Cheryl's Gardens


About this “Flow Hive” thing…
How you can help honeybees & pollinators

[+] Good Clean Dirt