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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Tools I Can’t Live Without

When you buy the right tools you can make garden maintenance easier (and less painful). Here are a few must-have favorites. Gardening isn’t all joy. Watching the garden evolve and change with the seasons is one of a gardener’s greatest pleasures but the pleasures also entail a lot of work. Therefore, the avid gardener is always searching for tools that will make maintenance easier ...

>> read “Tools I Can’t Live Without”    
Millstones: Symbols of Harvest in Today’s Gardens

When it comes to collecting millstones, the maxim “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” rings true. In the late 1880s, large urban mill operators started dumping these grain and corn crushers out back as a new roller technology made them obsolete and eventually put the smaller rural mills out of business. When propped alongside an old mill, the granite wheels’ interesting patterns began to attract attention for their ornamental appeal. Others were put to use as stepping stones along a path or a stoop for the back door ...

>> read “Millstones: Symbols of Harvest in Today’s Gardens”    
Starting From Scratch with Backyard Chickens

Chickens eat insect pests (including Japanese beetles), aerate the soil, ‘recycle’ kitchen scraps and their droppings are a natural fertilizer. Chickens and gardens really can grow together ...

>> read “Starting From Scratch with Backyard Chickens”    
Lilacs

What other plant captivates your senses and evokes fond memories of springtime more than lilacs? The intense fragrance of their large, beautiful flowers and their relative ease of care, make lilacs treasured throughout the temperate world. They bring us a few weeks of fabulous color and fragrance each year, but their loveliness and charm leave lifetime memories ...

>> read “Lilacs”       #Feature
Blue Sedge
Carex glauca ‘Blue Zinger’

This carex is easily grown in medium to wet soils. Ideal light is shade to part shade. Many members of the genus share the common name of rush or sedge. The cultivar ‘Blue Zinger’ refers to the bright blue color of the leaves, which endures winter in all but the coldest temperatures ...

>> read “Blue Sedge”       #Hot Plants
Build a Better Rose Garden

Roses have been cultivated for many centuries, but according to legend it was Empress Josephine who created the modern rose garden. Her ambition was to acquire every known variety, and her collection was laid out in orderly rows. Now 200 years later, many rose gardens are still planted out in this style ...

>> read “Build a Better Rose Garden”    
Narrow-Leaf Ironweed
Vernonia lettermannii

With its profusion of small purple flowers and tolerance of heat and drought, narrow-leaf ironweed (Vernonia lettermannii) is a standout in the late-season perennial border in USDA Zones 4 to 9. Native to dry, rocky flood plains in Arkansas and Oklahoma, narrow-leaf ironweed thrives in almost all soil types, except soggy, heavy soils. In fact, supplemental fertilizers and excessive watering are discouraged in the garden setting ...

>> read “Narrow-Leaf Ironweed”       #Hot Plants
What to Prune, When?

The sky is clear. The sun is bright. The weather is ideal for pruning. You’ve found pruners, loppers, pruning saw, gloves, paper trash bags and string. Walking around the yard, you scan your garden, trees and shrubs. You’re puzzled. What DO you prune, and WHEN should you prune it?

>> read “What to Prune, When?”    
Damaged Trees

Storms, wind, cold temperatures, the freeze-thaw cycle — all of these can injure trees and shrubs. What’s a gardener to do ...

>> read “Damaged Trees”    
The Right Tool For The Right Job

Planting and caring for trees and shrubs is one the best things you can do for the environment. Trees are critical tools in nature’s control of water and air pollution. They cast shade on hot sidewalks and reduce heat and air conditioning needs in homes and offices. Trees and shrubs provide food for pollinating insects, birds and people while beautifying the views ...

>> read “The Right Tool For The Right Job”       #Advice   #Feature   #Pruning
Site-Sensitive Natives

Just because it’s a native doesn’t mean it will be happy wherever you plant it. There are a lot of terrific reasons to grow native plants, but the most-cited reasons are not necessarily the best. There is little doubt that natives are hot. From two-minute TV segments to print media and even garden club lectures, you can’t avoid the message: “Grow native plants because they are easier, need less water and care and are better for the environment.” But is it true ...

>> read “Site-Sensitive Natives”    
Plant Your Spring Lawn Now

Next May, wouldn’t you love to have the best looking-lawn in your neighborhood? If your answer is yes, you need to begin by overseeding now. It is hard to believe that putting seed down now will make that big of a difference six months from now, but it does.

>> read “Plant Your Spring Lawn Now”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Consider Prairie Smoke
Prairie smoke can add distinct interest

[+] Mark's Garden Ruminations


New Home for Green Beans & Peas
Adding trellises to the vegetable garden

[+] From Cheryl's Gardens


About this “Flow Hive” thing…
How you can help honeybees & pollinators

[+] Good Clean Dirt