SUBSCRIBE & GET YOUR FREE 10% OFF DISCOUNT CARD
Subscribe Now
Give a Gift
Preview the magazine before you buy.
Read a FREE issue online!
Wisconsin Gardening Cover

Subscribe Today!
1-888-265-3600

 

  Sign up for our free gardening E-newsletter 
Give us your email address* and we'll provide monthly gardening tips and how-to's, great landscape ideas and plants to try — Delivered right to your inbox!
Your Email:
* Your email address will not be sold or shared with any third parties.

 

Calendar of Events
See our calendar for local events.

 

 

Get Involved
Participate in online discussions with an SBS user account.

Register Now  or  Log in

Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Preserving the Fall’s Colors

From rocket reds to flaming oranges and sunshine yellows, fall's brilliant colors blow past our windows on breezy winds. Wouldn't it be nice to capture some of these amazing colors to see throughout the year, instead of only during autumn? The good news is that you can. Preserving leaves with glycerin is an easy craft that anyone can do. Leave preserved with glycerin will ...

>> read “Preserving the Fall’s Colors”    
5 Design Mistakes Home Gardeners Make (and How to Avoid Them)

Garden design and gardening are not necessarily the same thing. Here are the most common design errors, why they are ‘bad’ and how to change your ways.

Here are the top five mistakes I see most often in my work as a professional gardener. They’re easy to fix ...

>> read “5 Design Mistakes Home Gardeners Make (and How to Avoid Them)”    
Don’t Cry for Me

We use a catchall term, weeping trees, to describe trees that are pendulous in nature. But so many other adjectives can be used to describe them. Some cascade; some drop like a curtain of rain, straight to the earth; others puddle and leapfrog along the ground; and a few stretch out as if they have wings and look as though they could take flight. People seem to either love them or hate them. The latter find them sad looking or depressing while the former find grace and elegance in their forms ...

>> read “Don’t Cry for Me”    
Gardening When it Hurts

After a day of gardening, do you crawl into bed with a heat pack, an ice pack or maybe even a six-pack? Do you have special pillows for knee pain, neck pain and a pair of wrist splints for carpal tunnel pain? When you limp to the kitchen for a midnight snack of aspirin, are there so many magnets strapped to your body that you stick to the refrigerator door?

>> read “Gardening When it Hurts”    
Conserving Water with Rain Barrels

Rain barrels are not a new concept. However, based on the many benefits they offer, it is surprising that they are not more commonly used. I have had my rain barrels now for three years and would highly recommend them to any gardener looking to conserve water by harnessing what nature provides.

>> read “Conserving Water with Rain Barrels”    
2013 New Year’s Resolutions for Gardeners

According to the Journal of Clinical Psychology from the University of Scranton, 45 percent of us make New Year’s resolutions. Here is a ranking of the top New Year’s resolutions for 2012 ...

>> read “2013 New Year’s Resolutions for Gardeners”    
Tips for Winter Tree & Shrub Care

Winter can be a difficult time for our trees and shrubs. Cold weather, snow, wind and more threaten their health. I’ve seen too many trees and shrubs lost that could have been saved with the right care. By caring for the roots, stem and crown you can maintain healthy and attractive plants through the most trying season of the year.

>> read “Tips for Winter Tree & Shrub Care”    
From the Mediterranean to Midwestern Gardens

Midwestern gardeners can ‘visit’ the Italian countryside by growing Umbrian plants – cyclamen of all kinds and colors, wisteria that scrambles up walls and trellises, ‘wild’ grape hyacinth and treasured tree peonies are just a few. Here’s where to start your trip ...

>> read “From the Mediterranean to Midwestern Gardens”    
The Gall of it All

Galls are the enlargement of plant tissue caused by injury or irritation by parasitic organisms such as insects, mites, nematodes, fungi and bacteria. They are also interesting looking — knotty, lumpy and sometimes colorful. Learn which ones are common in your garden.

>> read “The Gall of it All”    
Pruning: The When and Why

When are you supposed to prune lilacs? How about forsythia, weigela, beautyberry and roses? The biggest question about pruning is when to do it. The most common question I’m asked about pruning is when to prune a plant. There are different ways or reasons, but the biggest mystery usually is the timing. There are three “times” of year I suggest ...

>> read “Pruning: The When and Why”    
10 Stunning Plants for Dazzling Effects

Like many ornamental gardeners, it took me a while to warm up to annuals due to their expense and the fact that they have to be purchased every year. Once I got out of the comfort zone of traditional petunias and impatiens and started exploring what I call “temperannuals,” I haven’t looked back! Here are 10 favorites that will truly make your containers and beds sizzle ...

>> read “10 Stunning Plants for Dazzling Effects”    
Revive Your Lawn

It took a beating last summer, but don’t despair. There are steps you can take to return your turfgrass to its former glory. Your spring lawn will likely be an enchantress, ready to comfort you in green balm and lull you into forgetting the unattractive persona she wore last August ...

>> read “Revive Your Lawn”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Fragrant Abelia For Spring Scent!
Fragrant Abelia perfumes the spring air

[+] Mark's Garden Ruminations


New Home for Green Beans & Peas
Adding trellises to the vegetable garden

[+] From Cheryl's Gardens


About this “Flow Hive” thing…
How you can help honeybees & pollinators

[+] Good Clean Dirt