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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Winter Is for Reading

You don’t have to drool over catalogs with photographs of pastel petals dripping in dew, now arriving by the armloads, to feed your flower addiction in winter. Instead you can discover great, important, entertaining, informing and jaw-dropping beautiful garden books, magazines and pictures — with expired copyrights — completely free on the Internet. Everything you ever wanted to see and everything you never knew you wanted to see ...

>> read “Winter Is for Reading”    
Tough as Nails

What does your garden have to offer? Wet soil? Dry? Shade? Standing water? Here are some plants that will be happy there. With temperatures that can range from minus 30 to 105 F, the climate in the upper Midwest is a meteorological marvel. Alaska may be colder, but it can’t match us for heat. Saudi Arabia is hotter but rarely sees snow (yes, really; who knew?), let alone a thermometer that plummets to the depths familiar to all of us ...

>> read “Tough as Nails”    
Roses are Our Favorites

It’s been New York’s state flower since 1955, Georgia declared it as their emblematic flower in 1916, North Dakota and Iowa calls it their flower, and Ronald Reagan officially made it our national flower on November 20, 1986.

>> read “Roses are Our Favorites”    
Mercury Rising Tickseed

Be sure to add this brand new, first of its kind, truly hardy, red flowered coreopsis to your wish list this spring. It’s an absolute dynamo that blooms all summer. The broad mound of bright green foliage becomes covered in gorgeous, velvety, wine-red blossoms. During the hottest part of summer, the petals have lightly “frosted” tips. Like the others in the Big Bang™ series, the flowers on Mercury Rising are sterile, so it blooms continuously for months and won’t reseed around the garden ...

>> read “Mercury Rising Tickseed”       #Hot Plants
The New Faces of Urban Spaces
Raise Chickens, Rabbits and Goats

The food movement in this country has prompted many to rethink where our food comes from. Economic times have brought people around to giving “growing their own” some serious thought; after all, many remember our parents or grandparents stepping into the backyard and gathering eggs for breakfast or a mess of green beans for dinner or fresh milk from the family cow or goat.

>> read “The New Faces of Urban Spaces”    
Thousand Cankers Disease Arrives in Pennsylvania

Plant pathologists are usually not the most imaginative bunch when naming plant diseases. For instance, the rose disease caused by the fungus Diplocarpon rosae, causes a black spot on the foliage. This disease was given the name “black spot.” Another example is the fungal organism that causes a leaf spot on strawberry. In this instance, it was given the colorful name “common leaf spot.”

>> read “Thousand Cankers Disease Arrives in Pennsylvania”    
Conserving Water with Rain Barrels

Rain barrels are not a new concept. However, based on the many benefits they offer, it is surprising that they are not more commonly used. I have had my rain barrels now for three years and would highly recommend them to any gardener looking to conserve water by harnessing what nature provides.

>> read “Conserving Water with Rain Barrels”    
Seven-Son Flower
Heptacodium miconioides

Heptacodium miconioides or seven-son flower is new to most Minnesota gardeners. Sometimes called a crapemyrtle for the north, it is a large shrub with attractive peeling bark and late-summer blooms. When freezing temperatures evade our region until late fall, bright red calyxes develop, which offer further interest. Heptacodium is adaptable, but it prefers a sunny location and well-drained, neutral or acid soil.

>> read “Seven-Son Flower”       #Hot Plants
‘Ruby Falls’ Redbud
Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’

Gardeners hungry for great plants in small spaces will quickly welcome the ‘Ruby Falls’ weeping redbud (Cercis canadensis ‘Ruby Falls’) into their landscapes.

‘Ruby Falls’, bred at North Carolina State University from other purple-leafed redbuds ‘Covey’ and ‘Forest Pansy’, has the strong pink flowers of its parents – and their deep purple to shiny burgundy leaves that fade to green.

>> read “‘Ruby Falls’ Redbud”       #Hot Plants
Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’
Lagerstroemia (indica x fauriei) ‘Pocomoke’

Do you enjoy the late-season flowers of crapemyrtle but don’t have space for a tree? Allow me to introduce you to ‘Pocomoke’—a handsome, dwarf crapemyrtle. It’s not quite knee-high—a densely branched mound of deep rosy-raspberry flowers floating above forest-green leaves.

>> read “Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’”       #Hot Plants
Go Out & Look: Winter Scouting for Pests and Diseases

Which plants grew well this year? Which did poorly? Which now have diseases or insects? Now is the time to scout for insects and diseases in the landscape. End-of-the-year scouting is also a great excuse to enjoy a walk through the garden before cold weather sets in.

>> read “Go Out & Look: Winter Scouting for Pests and Diseases”    
Oh, Deer! 10 Tips for Keeping Deer out of Your Garden

A small herd of hungry deer —or even just a couple — can wipe out entire hosta beds, rows of hedges, swaths of daylilies and tulips and eat all of your roses. Close your garden “salad bar” by using several of these tips ...

>> read “Oh, Deer! 10 Tips for Keeping Deer out of Your Garden”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Fragrant Abelia For Spring Scent!
Fragrant Abelia perfumes the spring air

[+] Mark's Garden Ruminations


New Home for Green Beans & Peas
Adding trellises to the vegetable garden

[+] From Cheryl's Gardens


About this “Flow Hive” thing…
How you can help honeybees & pollinators

[+] Good Clean Dirt