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Your USDA Hardiness Zone

Featured Articles!

Moldy Trees? Or Is It Something Else?

“What do I do about my tree? It’s molding!” This has recently become a very common question I hear from gardeners in Northern Indiana, but is most likely a “problem” across the Midwest. Many individuals are seeing this “moldy” growth on the bark of trees or on branches that appear to be dead or dying back ...

>> read “Moldy Trees? Or Is It Something Else?”    
Support for Big Tomatoes

This sounds like a vegetable self-help group, but it is really all about keeping tomatoes off the ground.

Long-time gardeners have usually tried several tomato trellising systems in search of a heavy-duty solution ...

>> read “Support for Big Tomatoes”    
Create the Look of an English Garden In Your Midwest Landscape

Clusters of fragrant double roses clambering over white picket fences, fields of wildflowers and cottage gardens filled with lupines and delphiniums — this is what I expected to find when I traveled to London last spring for the first time ...

>> read “Create the Look of an English Garden In Your Midwest Landscape”    
2013 New Year’s Resolutions for Gardeners

According to the Journal of Clinical Psychology from the University of Scranton, 45 percent of us make New Year’s resolutions. Here is a ranking of the top New Year’s resolutions for 2012 ...

>> read “2013 New Year’s Resolutions for Gardeners”    
Edible Fig
Ficus carica

Though we wouldn’t plant a fig tree (Ficus carica) outdoors with winter coming, we certainly can buy one to grow indoors then plant outside in the spring. With global climate change and the USDA Planting Zone adjustments, some fig varieties will thrive where before they’d likely have died in temperatures below 10 F ...

>> read “Edible Fig”    
Helleborus ‘Walhelivor’ Ivory Prince

A new Plant of Merit Introduction for 2011 — and one of the earliest bloomers for spring (I’ve personally seen blooms the end of February). Helleborus ‘Walhelivor’ is commonly sold in commerce by the trade name of Ivory Prince. It was selected in 1995 in Sussex, England, from a controlled breeding program designed to produce new Helleborus sp. plants that exhibited ...

>> read “Helleborus ‘Walhelivor’ Ivory Prince”       #Hot Plants
Colorful Containers for Sun and Shade

Container plantings are so much fun to design because they give you much more flexibility. You can put them in areas where it is difficult to plant a flower bed, you can make a bold statement with only one container or you can place several as accents throughout your landscape ...

>> read “Colorful Containers for Sun and Shade”    
Rain, Rain, Don’t Go Away

Rainwater harvesting is one of the easiest ways gardeners can help save money and create beauty in their garden, while at the same time helping the environment.

>> read “Rain, Rain, Don’t Go Away”    
Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’
Lagerstroemia (indica x fauriei) ‘Pocomoke’

Do you enjoy the late-season flowers of crapemyrtle but don’t have space for a tree? Allow me to introduce you to ‘Pocomoke’—a handsome, dwarf crapemyrtle. It’s not quite knee-high—a densely branched mound of deep rosy-raspberry flowers floating above forest-green leaves.

>> read “Lagerstroemia ‘Pocomoke’”       #Hot Plants
Revive Your Lawn

It took a beating last summer, but don’t despair. There are steps you can take to return your turfgrass to its former glory. Your spring lawn will likely be an enchantress, ready to comfort you in green balm and lull you into forgetting the unattractive persona she wore last August ...

>> read “Revive Your Lawn”    
Try Something New

Now that 2013 is drawing to a close, it is time to think about next year. New plants and new varieties are introduced every year. The new versions may be more disease resistant, cold tolerant, have bigger fruit or even flowers in a new color.

Try These in 2014 ...

>> read “Try Something New”    
Tough as Nails

What does your garden have to offer? Wet soil? Dry? Shade? Standing water? Here are some plants that will be happy there. With temperatures that can range from minus 30 to 105 F, the climate in the upper Midwest is a meteorological marvel. Alaska may be colder, but it can’t match us for heat. Saudi Arabia is hotter but rarely sees snow (yes, really; who knew?), let alone a thermometer that plummets to the depths familiar to all of us ...

>> read “Tough as Nails”    
 
 
 

New from our Bloggers:


Fragrant Abelia For Spring Scent!
Fragrant Abelia perfumes the spring air

[+] Mark's Garden Ruminations


New Home for Green Beans & Peas
Adding trellises to the vegetable garden

[+] From Cheryl's Gardens


About this “Flow Hive” thing…
How you can help honeybees & pollinators

[+] Good Clean Dirt